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You Need to Hear This Afro-Cuban Funk Jam From Cimafunk

"Me Voy" is inspired by Nigerian afropop and pilón, a traditional Afro-Cuban carnival rhythm.

Cimafunk is a forward-looking Cuban artist who's crash landed on our radar with "Me Voy."

The singer, composer and producer makes music built on a fusion of Afro-Cuban rhythms with funk, blues and reggae—musical styles that he says he wishes to reunite because, as Cimafunk mentions, they all have a shared history of slavery and resistance. It's apt that his artist name refers to the Cimarrón people from Panama, enslaved Africans that escaped and lived as outlaws.

Cimafunk is now sharing his latest music video and single for "Me Voy," a jolting dose of energetic guitar riffs and Afro-Cuban percussion. As the artist and his team explain:

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Serious Klein. Image courtesy of the artist.

You Need to Stop and Watch Serious Klein's Epic Video for 'Voodoo Money'

An epic and stunning excursion into sin & forgiveness from the buzzing rapper.

Serious Klein is a Ghanaian-born self-described "art rapper" coming out of the German underground who's been making waves with his infectious blend of hip-hop, jazz and soul.

The artist is now releasing the new visual for his single, "Voodoo Money," a dark, hard-hitting track built on an ominous piano line and an inventive flip of Rich Boy's "Throw Some D's." The song was produced by Rascal, who's worked with Chance the Rapper.

Today we're premiering the music video for the strack, which was created by Serious Klein and HUSH & HYPE. The visual is an epic and stunning excursion into sin, forgiveness, and the decisions men make for money, women and power.

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Paul McCartney Smoked the Strongest Weed of His Life With Fela Kuti

He told the story in an interview for Marc Maron's WTF podcast.

Paul McCartney recently sat for an extended interview with Marc Maron in which he covered a bunch of Beatles memories, as well as many from his releases with Wings and solo career.

One anecdote that stands out is about his 1973 album with Wings, Band on the Run, which was recorded in Lagos, Nigeria.

Paul mentions that he decided to record in Nigeria because at that time it was "kind of fashionable for people not to record in their normal studios." So, he asked his label EMI what international locations they had studios in, and when he heard of the Lagos studio he was set on Nigeria.

When Paul arrives in Nigeria, the first thing he sees in the papers were headlines of Fela Kuti accusing him of "coming to steal the black man's music," a story he's told many times before.

So he calls up Fela and invites him to the studio to hear the songs he's working on, to prove that his recordings are nothing like afrobeat or any other African music. That's where the new bits of details of this story start.

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