Audio

Audio: DJ K-Ran 'Afrobeats Vibration Vol. 2'

Download a 2-hour "afrobeats" mixtape from Germany's DJ K-Ran.


Germany's DJ K-Ran rounds up some of the brightest and most addictive pop tracks from Kenya, Nigeria, Ghana and other parts of the continent in Afrobeats Vibration Vol. 2 — the sequel to his well-received Afrobeats mixtape from last year. The nearly 2-hour Afrobeats mixtape features club jams from usual suspects Camp Mulla, Davido, Wizkid, P-Square, May D, M.I., J Martins and plenty of others. Stream/download below and, while you're at it, brush up on the "afrobeats" genre-tag debate.

TRACKLIST

Camp Mulla– Prices (ft. Wizkid)

Camp Mulla– Addicted

Bonnie –Odabo

Burna Boy -Like to party

Juice –Yankee

Steveslil –Ebangha (ft. Z-lex)

Davido –Ekuro

A'won Boyz -Pakurumo Remix

E.M.E - Get down tonight

E.M.E - Sun mo mi

Tinny – Anaconda

Stay_Jay - Prepaid_gurl

Lynxxx –Fine Lady(ft. WizKid)

Davido –Overseas (ft. Sina Rambo)

Chuddy-K –Gaga crazy

Dammy Krane– My dear

Wizkid –Dance for me

Skales –Mukulu

Gasmilla – Aboodatoi

Guru –Lapaz toyota

MoeSBW –Azonto 4 Nima

KIG mile records - Head shoulders knees n toes

Stay Jay – Twaame Lala

P-Square –Alingo

Wizkid –Azonto freestyle

Iyanya –Kukere Remix (ft. D’Banj)

Keche –Aluguntugui

Squadee –You are_mine (ft. Sarkodie & Bright)

May D – Ile ijo

M.I – One naira (ft. Waje)

Kaakie – Toffee pon tongue

Raquel Ammah – Sweetio (ft. Sarkodie)

Wizkid – London Girl

Kaakie –Too much

Monica Ogah– Body Hug (ft. Wizboyy)

J Martins –Iva

Bracket -beautiful baby (ft. Flavour)

Flavour –Kwarikwa remix (ft. Fally Ipupa)

Tiffany –Agyekoom (ft. Castro)

Juice - Locks On Me (ft. Sampah)

Museba –Boom boom boom

Fuse ODG – Antenna

Guru –Karaoke (ft. Joe B)

Donaeo- Party Hard (Genairo Nvilla & Chuckie Amazone Project Remix

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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