Popular
Photo by Ryad Kramdi/AFP via Getty Images

Anti-Government Protests Intensify Among Algerian Students

Thousands of Algerian students are protesting against a presidential election scheduled for December 12th.

Thousands of students in Algeria have again taken to the streets of the capital city Algiers to protest the presidential election set to take place tomorrow.

Aljazeera reports that weeks of protests have seen students, now joined by workers, demanding political reforms and a removal of the political elite from the Algerian government.


Earlier this year in February, anti-government protests broke out after then President Abdelaziz Bouteflika announced that he was extending his two-decade rule by running for a fifth term. However, after consecutive weeks of massive rallies and marches, Bouteflika officially stepped down as president. The 82-year-old was quoted as saying in a statement at the time, "There will be no fifth term," He added that, "There was never any question of it for me. Given my state of health and age, my last duty towards the Algerian people was always contributing to the foundation of a new Republic."

After Bouteflika's resignation, General Ahmed Gaid Salah emerged as the key figure within Algeria's political landscape. He proposed that a presidential election would be the "surest way to break the country's political deadlock".

However, many Algerian feel that the five presidential candidates, all of who are senior Bouteflika-era officials, will only serve to "regenerate the system" and result in "cosmetic changes" in the governance of the country. Additionally, they also want the interim President Abdelkader Bensalah and Prime Minister Noureddine Bedoui to be removed from government as well.

"Algerians want radical change. They are fed up," says 25-year-old protesting student Ahmed Kamili to Reuters.

Popular
Photo by Giles Clarke/UNOCHA via Getty Images

Cameroon Holds Vigil to Remember Children Killed in School Attack

Residents in Kumba paid their respects to the seven lives lost, and those injured during the attack over the weekend.

In the latest tragedy to come from Cameroon's historically violent clash between Anglo and Francophone citizens, seven children were murdered after attackers stormed a school with guns and machetes over the weekend.

In what has been deemed as the "darkest and saddest day," by Bishop Agapitus Nfon of Kumba, armed attackers stormed the Mother Francisca International Bilingual Academy, targeting students aged 9 to 12. The tragic event saw dozens of children injured, some critically.

The attack has shocked the nation, with both local and international agencies condemning the horrible offense. On Monday, Cameroonian President Paul Biya denounced the "horrific murder" of the school children, and alluded to the "appropriate measures" being taken in order to bring justice to the families of the victims. Prime Minister Dion Ngute Joseph shared his condolences via a tweet saying, "I bow before the memory of these innocent kids."

The Cameroonian presidency and governing body have blamed Anglophone 'separatists' for the attack, though the group claims no part in the attack.

Human rights groups, however, have blamed both opposing parties, as the conflict has led to the death of over 3,000 deaths and resulted in more than 700,000 Cameroonians fleeing their homes and the country.

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Interview: Meet Velemseni, Eswatini’s Queen of Soul

Soul artist Velemseni's music reflects Eswatini culture and aesthetics. "The Kingdom of Eswatini is a magical and mysterious place, and my music aims to interpret and document that mystique, drawing from genres like Swazi gospel, soul, African soul, cinematic and traditional music," says the artist.