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Botswana Has Denied Entry to the South African President's Sister-in-Law

Botswana's media speculate that Bridgette Radebe meddled in the country's political affairs and elections.

Ordinarily, South Africans do not require a visa to travel to Botswana, a neighboring country. However, the wife to South African Minister of Energy Jeff Radebe and sister-in-law to President Cyril Ramaphosa, was instructed by the Botswana government to obtain a visa according to the SowetanLIVE.

Although an official reason was not given for barring her from entering the country without a visa, the local media believe it is because Bridgette Radebe meddled in the political affairs of the country.


It is alleged that Radebe interfered in the recent election in an attempt to remove President Mokgweetsi Masisi of the ruling Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) and have him replaced by Botswana's Minister of Foreign Affairs, Pelonomi Venson-Moitoi.

In what was allegedly seen as an elaborate plot to smuggle money into the country in order to finance Venson-Moitoi's election campaign, one can hardly blame Botswana's government for wanting to at least restrict Radebe from coming and going as she pleases.

Whilst she and her brother have released no official statements as yet, News24 reported that President Ramaphosa has since sent the Minister of International Relations, Lindiwe Sisulu, to Botswana in order to investigate whether his sister-in-law did in fact meddle in the country's affairs as well as to repair relations with President Masisi.

With only a few weeks left before South Africa's own national elections, President Ramaphosa cannot afford any further scandals that rock the country and comprise the ruling African National Congress's (ANC) chances of being victorious.

READ: South African Youth on 2019 Elections: "The ANC can no longer self-correct"

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Photo: Alvin Ukpeh.

The Year Is 2020 & the Future of Nigeria Is the Youth

We discuss the strength in resolve of Nigeria's youth, their use of social media to speak up, and the young digital platforms circumventing the legacy media propaganda machine. We also get first-hand accounts from young creatives on being extorted by SARS and why they believe the protests are so important.

In the midst of a pandemic-rife 2020, the voices of African youth have gotten louder in demand for a better present and future. From structural reforms, women's rights, LGBTQ rights, and derelict states of public service, the youths have amplified their voices via the internet and social media, to cohesively express grievances that would hitherto have been quelled at a whisper.

Nigerian youth have used the internet and social media to create and sustain a loud voice for themselves. The expression of frustration and the calls for change may have started online, but it's having a profound effect on the lives of every Nigerian with each passing day. What started as the twitter hashtag #EndSARS has grown into a nationwide youth revolution led by the people.

Even after the government supposedly disbanded the SARS (Special Anti-Robbery Squad) unit on the 10th of October, young Nigerians have not relented in their demands for better policing. The lack of trust for government promises has kept the youth protesting on the streets and online.

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