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Botswana Has Officially Decriminalized Homosexuality

The High Court Judges rightfully asked, "What compelling public interest is there necessitating such a law? There is no victim."

Botswana's High Court has officially decriminalized homosexuality in the Southern African country. According to the BBC, after hearing the case of a student who appeared in court along with LGBT advocacy group LEGABIBO, Sections 164 and 167 of the country's Penal Code have been found to be unconstitutional.


The LGBT community and its allies have been rallying for the repeal of several sections in the Penal Codes of various African countries. Just last month, Kenya's High court made the disappointing decision to keep Section 162 of its Penal Code and uphold the criminal status of homosexuality.

Whilst these laws do not explicitly criminalize homosexuality itself, they do outlaw any acts of sexual intimacy between same-sex individuals which effectively amounts to the criminalization of homosexuality as a whole. Under Botswana's now past law, a law that's been in place since 1965, a person could be sentenced to up to seven years in prison for "carnal knowledge of any person against the order of nature".

After a postponement of the judgement in March this year, today, Judges Tafa, Leburu and Dube came to the unanimous decision to do away with Sections 164 and 167. They said that, "Sexual orientation is not a fashion statement. It's an important attribute of one's personality. All people are entitled to autonomy over their sexual expression." Judge Leburu also added that, "Public opinion in cases like this is relevant but not decisive. This is about fundamental rights more than the public's view."

This is a just and deserved victory for the LGBT community. Furthermore, it also represents the active dismantling of colonial-era laws which really have no place in any African country.

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Image: Nabsolute Media

Reekado Banks Recalls The Carnage of The #EndSARS Protests In Single 'Ozumba Mbadiwe'

The Nigerian singer pays his respects to those lost during last year's #EndSARS protests.

Nigerian singer and songwriter Reekado Banks is back with a track that is as socially important as it is a banger. It seems fitting for the singer's first solo release of the year to be a tribute to his fellow countrypeople fighting for a country that they all wish to live in. The 27-year-old Afrobeats crooner has returned with endearing track 'Ozumba Mbadiwe', honoring the one-year anniversary of the #EndSARS protests that saw the Nigerian government authorize an onslaught of attacks on Nigerian citizens for their anti-government demonstrations.

The protests took the world by storm, additionally because the Nigerian government insists that none of the police brutality happened. In an attempt to gaslight the globe, Nigerian officials have come out to hoards to deny any and all accusations of unlawfully killing peaceful protesters. Banks mentions the absurd denials in the track, singing "October 20, 2020 something happened with the government, they think say we forget," in the second verse. Reekado's reflective lyrics blend smoothly and are supported by the upbeat, effortless Afrobeat rhythm.

In another reflective shoutout to his home, 'Ozumba Mbadiwe' is named after a popular expressway on Lagos Island that leads to the infamous Lekki Toll Gate where protesters were shot at, traumatized, and murdered. Although packed with conscious references, the P.Priime produced track is a perfect amalgamation of the talents that Reekado Banks has to offer; a wispy opening verse, a hook to kill, and an ethereal aura to mark this as a song as a hit. On "Ozumba Mbadiwe," all the elements align for Reekado's signature unsinkable sound to take flight.

Check out Reekado Bank's lyric video for his single 'Ozumba Mbadiwe'

Reekado Banks - Ozumba Mbadiwe (Lyric Video) www.youtube.com

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Tems Is Just Doing Her Thang In New Music Video 'Crazy Tings'

The Nigerian songstress is hell bent on taking over your summer playlist and it's getting harder to resist.