News Brief

Brazilian Judoka Claps Back at Racists Who Called Her 'A Monkey' at the London Games

Rafaela Silva took a moment to address racist trolls from the London games during a post-victory press conference last week.

For Judoka Rafaela Silva, winning Brazil’s first gold medal at Rio is a testament to overcoming the wave of racist comments directed at her by fellow Brazilians on social media after London 2012.


Silva, who is Afro-Brazilian, grew up less than 10 miles from the Olympic stadium in the notorious City of God favela. Last Monday, she dominated her Mongolian opponent Sumiya Dorjsuren—ranked the number one fighter in their weight class—to win the gold.

Growing up as a queer black woman from the slums, at the intersection of Brazil’s most marginalized communities, Silva has certainly beaten the odds stacked against her.

"If you are black, people in the street look at you with suspicion. If you go by someone they move their wallet away," the new Olympic champion explains.

Silva’s moment of triumph served as the ultimate clap back to the racists who had called her “a monkey” after an illegal hold in a second-round match disqualified her from the London games. Their trolling caused Silva to spiral into a depression and nearly bow out of judo altogether.

A self-assured Silva took a moment to snatch the edges of her haters during a post-victory press conference, saying:

I want to show those who criticized me in London who said I was an embarrassment to my family that a monkey belongs in a cage and not in the Olympics, now that monkey who was supposed to be in a cage in London is out of the cage, and is Olympic champion here in Rio de Janeiro.

Oh snap!

Watch Silva’s press conference below.

Interview

Kofi Jamar Switches Lanes In 'Appetite for Destruction'

The Ghanaian rapper and "Ekorso" hitmaker presents a different sound in his latest EP.

The drill scene in Ghana has been making waves across the continent for some time now. If you're hip to what a crop of young and hungry artists from the city of Kumasi in Ghana and beyond have been doing over the past year, then you already know about rapper Kofi Jamar.

Towards the end of November last year he dropped one of the biggest drill songs to emerge from Ghana's buzzing drill scene, the popular street anthem "Ekorso." In the December and January that followed, "Ekorso" was the song on everyone's lips, the hip-hop song that took over the season, with even the likes of Wizkid spotted vibing to the tune.

Currently sitting at over 10 million streams across digital streaming platforms, the song topped charts, even breaking records in the process. "Ekorso" maintained the number one spot on Apple Music's Hip-Hop/Rap: Ghana chart for two months uninterrupted, a first in the history of the chart. It also had a good stint at number one of the Ghana Top 100 chart as well, among several other accolades.

Even though he's the creator of what could be the biggest song of Ghana's drill movement till date, Kofi Jamar doesn't plan on replicating his past music or his past moves. He has just issued his second EP, a 6-track project titled Appetite for Destruction, and it would surprise you to know that there isn't a single drill song on it. Although drill played a huge role in his meteoric rise, he wants to be known as way more than just a drill rapper. He wants to be known as a complete and versatile artist, unafraid to engage in any genre — and he even looks forward to creating his own genre of music during the course of his career.

We spoke to Kofi Jamar about his latest EP, and he tells us about working with Teni, why he's gravitating away from drill to a new sound, and more. Check out our conversation below.

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