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Brymo Released A 'Nude' Music Video And Nigerian Twitter Is Going Crazy

The Nigerian singer has the whole internet arguing about his new music video for "Heya!"

Brymo just recently released his latest single "Heya!," the lead track from his sixth album, OṢÓ—and its accompanying music video has really gotten people talking.

The cinematic visual for "Heya!," shot by NVMB3R Production, features Brymo wearing only a loincloth as he steps out of Lagos Lagoon and sits at a piano to play his song.


"I decided to appear how my forbears dressed before the arrival of civilization to Nubian continent," Brymo says to Pulse. "We have all seen the costume in many movies, 'Heya' was my own representation of that age; A bushman in the city, that's my image of most black Africans of today. Although we reside in cities, we are still villagers in our thoughts and actions."

The reactions, needless to say, have been mixed and arguments are definitely getting started.

Some are praising Brymo for his bold choices and pointing out the double standards from those criticizing him (i.e. if Kanye can go naked in "Famous" and have the public call it art, why can't Brymo), while others think the singer's gone completely crazy.

The more pessimistic Nigerians on Twitter are calling the artist out for a blatant attempt at going viral by shedding his clothes. But most are just doing what Twitter usually does: make jokes.

For his part, Brymo adds to Pulse: "The reaction online is mixed, and many BrymO fans think it's exactly what they wanted to see. For those who disagree with the image, I understand that they have forgotten how people dressed across the continent many centuries ago, or they couldn't fit the costume to the story in the song... but what better way is there to tell the story of our disloyalty and disservice to each other, if not by bearing it all, butt and what not... lol."

Check out the music video in question above and some of the best reactions below. What's your take?

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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