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Nigerians Are Mad at Buhari For Arriving On a Red Carpet When Visiting the Families of the Missing Dapchi Girls

The president visited the site where 110 schoolgirls were abducted on Wednesday, but his visit provided little reassurance.

It has been nearly a month since 110 schoolgirls, were abducted by Boko Haram at a boarding school in Dapchi, Nigeria—located in the northeastern state of Yobe.

President Buhari made a long-overdue visit to the state yesterday to meet with the girls' families, promising them that the country "will not rest" until the girls are returned home safely," reports CNN. "We have re-equipped our armed forces, security and intelligence services," said the president during his speech, before assuring families that "any agency, person or group found to have been negligent or culpable" would face punishment.

"The government, under my watch, will continue to maintain normalcy and ensure that incidents of this nature are stopped," he continued.

Nigerians are not convinced.


Buhari—who is often criticized for his failure to act speedily in times of crisis—arrived at the Government Girls Science Technical College in Dapchi, about 24 days after the incident took place, with 6 helicopters, a government entourage and a full military crew—even rolling out a red carpet to walk on upon his arrival.

His appearance did more to anger families than to comfort them. Several parents told BBC Africa, that they were not reassured by the president's words, and remain disappointed by his lack of action in dealing with the matter. According to the publication, one mother called him out directly, asking where the soldiers he had traveled with were when her daughter was kidnapped.

Nigerians on social media have also expressed anger at the president's actions, many comments focusing particularly on his decision to arrive on a red carpet.

Image via Sheila Afari PR.

9 Black Electronic Musicians You Should Be Listening To

Featuring DJ Lag, Spellling, Nozinja, Klein, LSDXOXO and more.

We know that Black queer DJs from the Midwest are behind the creation of house and dance music. Yet, a look at the current electronic scene will find it terribly whitewashed and gentrified, with the current prominent acts spinning tracks sung by unnamed soulful singers from time to time. Like many art forms created by Black people all over the world, the industry hasn't paid homage to its pioneers, despite the obvious influence they have. Thankfully, the independent music scene is thriving with many Black acts inspired by their forefathers and mothers who are here to revolutionize electronic music. Here are a list of the ones you should check out:

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Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

Kwesta Slams BMW South Africa’s Latest Advert For Using His Song Without Permission

Kwesta has called out BMW South Africa for blatantly using his song without his permission.

Kwesta has called out BMW South Africa for blatantly using his song without his permission and not crediting him. In a new advert promoting the new limited edition 330iS, BMW South Africa tapped into the BMW 3 Series' heritage in South Africa by using Kwesta's mega hit "Spirit". According to the artist, he wasn't contacted about the use of his song. The hip-hop super star took to Twitter to slam the German automobile manufacturer for their ad.

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Photo by Trevor Stuurman.

Interview: Thando Hopa Never Anticipated Acceptance in the Industry—She Anticipated a Fight

We speak to the South African lawyer, model, actress and activist about her historic Vogue cover, stereotypes imposed on people living with albinism and her work with human interest stories about vulnerable groups as a WEF fellow.

Vogue Portugal's April edition was a moment that caused everyone to hold their breath collectively. For the first time ever, a woman living with albinism was featured on the cover of the magazine in a sublime and timeless manner. Thando Hopa, a South African lawyer, model, actress and activist was the woman behind this historic first. It was not just a personal win for Hopa, but a victory for a community that continues to be underrepresented, stigmatised and even harmed for a condition outside of their control, particularly in Africa.

At just 31, the multi-hyphenate Hopa is a force to be reckoned with across different spaces. Through her considerable advocacy work as an activist, Hopa has and continues to dispel stereotypes and misconceptions about people living with albinism as well as changing what complex representation looks like within mainstream media. In 2018, Hopa was named the one of the world's 100 most influential women by the BBC. After hanging up her gown as a legal prosecutor after four years of working with victims of sexual assault, Hopa is on a mission to change skewed perceptions and prejudices when it comes to standards of beauty.

As a current fellow at the World Economic Forum, she is also working towards changing editorial oversights that occur when depicting historically underrepresented and vulnerable groups. The fellowship programme prepares individuals for leadership in both public and private sectors, and to work across all spheres of global society.

OkayAfrica recently spoke to Hopa to find out about how it felt to be the first woman with albinism to be featured on Vogue, the current projects she's working on and what's in the pipeline for her.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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Uzo Aduba Snags 2020 Emmy Award for Role in 'Mrs America'

Nigerian-American actress Uzo Aduba was awarded an Emmy for her stellar performance as Civil Rights icon Shirley Chisholm in 'Mrs America'.