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Cameroonian Prime Minister Philémon Yang (center) via Wikimedia

Government in Cameroon Blames “Diaspora on Social Media” for Violence

Prime minister claims that the diaspora on social media is spreading "hate speech" and "ordering murders."

Yang Philemon, the prime minister of Cameroon, claimed that the diaspora on social media are responsible for inciting violence.

Following protests in 2016 where Anglophone separatists in Cameroon called out discrimination from the largely Francophone government, the violence has escalated in the country. Despite the rise of military violence from the Cameroonian government in anglophone regions, the prime minister is blaming the diaspora on social media for spreading "hate speech" and "ordering murder."

According to BBC, the prime minister said, "Social media have become the favourite ground for the sponsors of terrorism orchestrated by Cameroonians in the diaspora. Crouched in the shadows and hidden behind the keyboards of their computer and smartphones, these Cameroonians of the diaspora spread hate speech and terror and do not hesitate to order murders."

Mr. Philemon added that 80 members of the security forces have been killed, 100-or-so civilians and state representatives have been killed or kidnapped during the fighting with Anglophone separatists.

Mr. Philemon also launched a new $220m (£167m) emergency humanitarian assistance plan for the civilians that have been displaced by the fighting.

Amnesty International recently reported the fighting in Cameroon as a human rights crisis. The report states that the Cameroonian government has responded to Anglophone regions with "arbitrary arrests, torture, unlawful killings and destruction of property and torture committed by the Cameroonian security forces during military operations conducted in the Anglophone regions."
Interview

Interview: Mau From Nowhere Reinvents Himself

The Kenyan artist goes soul-searching with his new MFN EP.

Movement is the crux of mau from nowhere's music—the hip-hop and afropop undertones that dominate his work present a well-traveled artist.

Born in Kenya, Mau spent his life oscillating between the East African nation and England, followed by a short stint spent furthering his studies in New York. In a full-circle moment, mau uprooted his life in the big apple amidst the madness pandemic and made the move to Nairobi.

Listening to the MFN EP feels like diving head first into a pool of Mau's consciousness. He once spoke about the conflict between telling his fans to share their grief while withholding his own, but his latest offering MFN is far from stoic. The project marks his evolution from Kamau Wainana, the soft spoken kid with loud ambitions to mau from nowhere, a trailblazer defining music within 'Nu Nairobi.' As he gets less attached to being defined by a certain space, it's entrancing to watch him find comfort in his craft instead.

In this interview below, we demystify the man behind the music by discussing love, growth, disappointment and the recurrent themes of familial and romantic relationships.

This interview has been edited for brevity and clarity.

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