News Brief
Courtesy of Samba Yonga

Check out the Women's History Museum's 'Leading Ladies' Podcast

'Leading Ladies' is a Zambian historical podcast on influential women who lived between the 17th and 19th century.

The Women's History Museum in Zambia was founded by Samba Yonga and Mulenga Kapwepwe a few years ago. Perhaps the most intriguing fact about the museum is that it doesn't occupy any actual physical space but is instead a digital archive meant to change how society views the role of women in Zambia.


Whilst Yonga and Kapwepwe have been collecting artifacts which will eventually be housed in the Lusaka National Museum, they have launched a bad-ass animated podcast highlighting influential African women who were in significant leadership positions and all lived between the 17th and 19th century.

The incredible women to be featured on the podcast have been cryptically labelled "the feminist", "the diplomat", "the politician", "the general", "the warrior", "the head of state", "the peacemaker", "the power broker", "the secretary of state" and "the innovator".

Speaking in a press release about the podcast series, Yonga said:

"The aim of the series is to highlight and mainstream these stories so Zambia's historical narrative gains new knowledge and perceptions of women are influenced positively."

The podcast series has been launched today and the first woman to be featured is "the general". The series will be free to access on the museum's online platforms. You can tune in right now and watch the live premier of Leading Ladies on their FaceBook page here.

Courtesy of Samba Yonga

Interview

Interview: Wavy The Creator Is Ready to See You Now

The multidisciplinary Nigerian-American artist on tapping into all her creative outlets, creating interesting things, releasing a new single and life during quarantine.

A trip canceled, plans interrupted, projects stalled. It is six months now since Wavy the Creator has had to make a stop at an undisclosed location to go into quarantine and get away from the eye of the pandemic.

The professional recording artist, photographer, writer, fashion artist, designer, and evolving creative has been spending all of this time in a house occupied by other creatives. This situation is ideal. At least for an artist like Wavy who is always in a rapid motion of creating and bringing interesting things to life. The energy around the house is robust enough to tap from and infuse into any of her numerous creative outlets. Sometimes, they also inspire trips into new creative territories. Most recently, for Wavy, are self-taught lessons on a bass guitar.

Wavy's days in this house are not without a pattern, of course. But some of the rituals and personal rules she drew up for herself, like many of us did for internal direction, at the beginning of the pandemic have been rewritten, adjusted, and sometimes ditched altogether. Some days start early and end late. Some find her at her sewing machine fixing up thrift clothes to fit her taste, a skill she picked up to earn extra cash while in college, others find her hard at work in the studio, writing or recording music.

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