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Courtesy of Samba Yonga.

The Women's History Museum's 'Leading Ladies' Podcast Returns for Second Season.

Women's History Museum's 'Leading Ladies' Podcast Returns for Second Season

After the successful launch of 'Leading Ladies' last year, the historical Zambian podcast series on influential women from the 17th to 19th century now returns for a second season.

The Women's History Museum, based in Zambia, is back with the second season of its Leading Ladies podcast which was launched last year. The animated series highlights the lives of influential African women who lived between the 17th and 19th century. A collaboration between the Women's History Museum and Hivos Southern Africa Region, the series will tell the "hidden" stories of bad-ass women from across the continent including Zambia, Malawi, Zimbabwe and more.


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The first episode of season two aired this past Wednesday and is freely available and accessible on the museum's online platforms. Without giving away any spoilers, the first episode highlights Christine Munkombwe who won Miss Zambia back in 1974 but was stripped of her title after she accused the Miss World Pageant organisers of being racists who "never gave consideration to Black skin."

Speaking about the second season of the podcast, co-founder of the Women's History Museum, Samba Yonga says:

"These stories challenge the idea that, in the past, women were not capable of being leaders or contributing significantly to our societies", says co-founder of the museum and story writer Mulenga Kapwepwe. The idea is to have it as a travelling exhibition which can be shared on many platforms such as radio and TV both locally and internationally...The aim of the series is to highlight and mainstream these stories so Zambia's historical narrative gains new knowledge and perceptions of women are influenced positively."

Watch the preview to the second season below:


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