Audio

Chimurenga Renaissance 'The B.A.D Is So Good'

'The B.A.D Is So Good' is the first single off Chimurenga Renaissance's forthcoming riZe vadZimu riZe (out 3/25) via Brick Lane.


Chimurenga Renaissance, the Zimbabwe-nodding side project of Tendai 'Baba' Maraire - one half of the Seattle art-rap duo Shabazz Palaces - seamlessly melds a variety of otherwise incongruous sounds together in the first single off an upcoming full-length release. "The B.A.D Is So Good" kicks off with Electric Feel-esque falsetto vocals on a sonic journey that ends up somewhere between Kendrick's idiosyncratic tone and the Zimbabwean eccentricity of Maraire's earlier Defenders of the Crusades EP. The mbira sound, mixed in with the rise and fall of synth power chords, points to the experimental production of Shabazz Palaces' Black Up. Attempting to pigeonhole Tendai Maraire's busy sound is entirely futile, so stream the impressive track below instead.

Watch out for Chimurenga Renaissance's upcoming full-length riZe vadZimu riZe, due out March 25th via Seattle's Brick Lane Records. The album is set to feature guest spots from Seattle hippie hip-hop duo THEESatisfaction, Dead Prez member and AIYE alum M1, and Mall Saint.

OKA TV

Amaarae Breaks Down Her Hits In OkayAfrica's New Video Series 'Decoded'

In Decoded, our favorite African artists dive deep into their music, lyrics and share notable behind-the-scenes moments.

We're launching Decoded, our brand new pop-up style video series featuring the latest, buzzing African artists' music and influences.

We kick things off with Ghanaian-American singer-songwriter-producer Amaarae who has been making waves with the release of her debut album, The Angel You Don't Know.

In our first-ever Decoded episode, Amaarae breaks down hit songs like "Trust Fund Baby", "Jumping Ship" with Kojey Radical as well as her Southern rap musical influences. She also mentions being inspired by an op-ed that she penned for OkayAfrica in 2019, and her mother's role in helping her coin the album title The Angel You Don't Know.

When all is said and done, Amaarae just wants to give other young women "an option not to have to be the archetypal female African artist, and give them an opportunity to expand all of their possibilities, explore all the different genres, and still be successful and get this money." Amen to that!

Check out our first episode of Decoded with Amaarae below.

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