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Cover art for "Killi Mi" courtesy of the artist.

Cina Soul’s New Track ‘Killi Mi’ Offers a Bold Take on Domestic Violence

The Ghanaian singer uses her voice and lyrics to paint a picture of the vicious cycle of abuse.

23-year-old Ghanaian singer Cina Soul has delivered a powerful track that addresses gender based violence and the various abuses women face. The track, called "Killi Mi," is generating a lot of responses and love on Twitter, with many in awe of the emotion they feel from the 2019 Ghanaian female vocalist of the year nominee.


The song, sung in mostly in her native Ga, touches on one of the difficult parts of abuse—the inability to find help and the difficult cycle many victims find themselves in. The character in the song goes to her mother but cannot find solace, she questions why her partner would beat her when she does what he asks and she frames all with the quintessential choral line "dey killi me." Many victims in abusive relationships report not being able to gain support from their family members or friends, often forcing them to doubt themselves and stay in the relationship—convincing themselves it is also for love and sometimes becoming abusive themselves.

In true protest song form, the strength of the lyrics come packaged in beautifully composed instrumentals. The song, produced by NiiQuaye, has a slow island vibe complete with a strong brass section. While the percussion and guitar has an upbeat and rhythmic feel, the horns showcase the melancholy and despair that the singer is conveying, starting high and ending low. It's a soul-stirring song that is making many stop and think. The visuals for the video, directed by Gene Adu, were released regionally today and included a flip on the narrative—stay tuned for a global release.

In the meantime, stream the song below and check some reactions on twitter.








Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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