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Cinemafrique: African Film & TV News On TIFF Award Winning Sudanese Doc 'Beats Of The Antonov,' Naija Hyena Handlers, 'The Art of Ama Ata Aidoo' + More

Okayafrica's Cinemafrique looks at African film and TV news on Sudanese documentary 'Beats Of The Antonov,' hyena handlers of Nigeria and more.


New Biographical Documentary The Art of Ama Ata Aidoo Highlights Work of Pioneering Ghanaian Author

Writer/director/producer Yaba Badoe's feature documentary, The Art of Ama Ata Aidoo, was successfully funded with an Indiegogo campaign earlier this year surpassing its projected goal of $45,000 to complete post-production. The hour-long documentary film, which follows celebrated Ghanaian novelist, poet and playwright Ama Ata Aidoo for a year as she divides her time between her hometown and the United States, traces the course of her career over seven decades and her rise to literary excellence during the heyday of Ghana's independence struggle. Aidoo became the first published African woman playwright with the publication of her first play, The Dilemma Of A Ghost, in 1965 (when she was only 25). As one of Africa's most prominent female authors Aidoo has served as an inspiration to scores of African writers. The film's official synopsis reads:

The Art of Ama Ata Aidoo explores the artistic contribution of one of African’s foremost woman writers, a trailblazer for an entire generation of exciting new talent. The film charts Ama Ata Aidoo’s creative journey in a life that spans 7 decades from colonial Ghana through the tumultuous era of independence to a more sober present day Africa where nurturing women’s creative talent remains as hard as ever. Over the course of a year the film follows Aidoo as she returns home to her ancestral village in the Central Region of Ghana, launches her latest collection of short stories in Accra, and travels to the University of California, Santa Barbara to attend the premier of her seminal play about the slave trade, Anowa. With contributions from Carole Boyce Davies, Nana Wilson- Tagoe and Vincent Odamtten, The Art of Ama Ata Aidoo gives a fascinating insight into the life of a feminist poet and novelist and brings Aidoo’s writing to new audiences.

Watch a short teaser clip and an official trailer from The Art of Ama Ata Aidoo below featuring excerpts of the Commonwealth Prize-winning writer's work.

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Music, Identity & War In Sudan: Beats Of The Antonov Debuts Online

Sudanese director Hajooj Kuka's 'Beats Of The Antonov' documentary on music, identity and war in Sudan is available to watch in full on PBS.

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Sundance 2015: Senegalese Documentary 'Sembène!' + Rwandan Filmmaker Kivu Ruhorahoza's 'Things Of The Aimless Wanderer'

Senegalese documentary 'Sembène!' and Rwandan filmmaker Kivu Ruhorahoza's 'Things Of The Aimless Wanderer' are screening at Sundance 2015.

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Photo by Lana Haroun

From #FeesMustFall to #BlueforSudan: OkayAfrica's Guide to a Decade of African Hashtag Activism

The 2010s saw protest movements across the continent embrace social media in their quest to make change.

The Internet and its persistent, attention-seeking child, Social Media has changed the way we live, think and interact on a daily basis. But as this decade comes to a close, we want to highlight the ways in which people have merged digital technology, social media and ingenuity to fight for change using one of the world's newest and most potent devices—the hashtag.

What used to simply be the "pound sign," the beginning of a tic-tac-toe game or what you'd have to enter when interacting with an automated telephone service, the hashtag has become a vital aspect of the digital sphere operating with both form and function. What began in 2007 as a metadata tag used to categorize and group content on social media, the term 'hashtag' has now grown to refer to memes (#GeraraHere), movements (#AmINext), events (#InsertFriendsWeddingHere) and is often used in everyday conversation ("That situation was hashtag awkward").

The power of the hashtag in the mobility of people and ideas truly came to light during the #ArabSpring, which began one year into the new decade. As Tunisia kicked off a revolution against oppressive regimes that spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook played a crucial role in the development and progress of the movements. The hashtag, however, helped for activists, journalists and supporters of causes. It not only helped to source information quickly, but it also acted as a way to create a motto, a war cry, that could spread farther and faster than protestors own voices and faster than a broadcasted news cycle. As The Guardian wrote in 2016, "At times during 2011, the term Arab Spring became interchangeable with 'Twitter uprising' or 'Facebook revolution,' as global media tried to make sense of what was going on."

From there, the hashtag grew to be omnipresent in modern society. It has given us global news, as well as strong comedic relief and continues to play a crucial role in our lives. As the decade comes to a close, here are some of the most impactful hashtags from Africans and for Africans that used the medium well.

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Screenshot from the upcoming film Warriors of a Beautiful Game

In Conversation: Pelé's Daughter is Making a Documentary About Women's Soccer Around the World

In this exclusive interview, Kely Nascimento-DeLuca shares the story behind filming Warriors of a Beautiful Game in Tanzania, Brazil and other countries.

It may surprise you to know that women's soccer was illegal in Brazil until 1981. And in the UK until 1971. And in Germany until 1970. You may have read that Sudan made its first-ever women's league earlier this year. Whatever the case, women and soccer have always had a rocky relationship.

It wasn't what women wanted. It certainly wasn't what they needed. However, society had its own ideas and placed obstacle after obstacle in front of women to keep ladies from playing the game. Just this year the US national team has shown the world that women can be international champions in the sport and not get paid fairly compared to their male counterparts who lose.

Kely Nascimento-DeLuca is looking to change that. As the daughter of international soccer legend Pelé, she is no stranger to the game. Growing up surrounded by the sport, she was actually unaware of the experiences women around the world were having with it. It was only recently that she discovered the hardships around women in soccer and how much it mirrored women's rights more generally.

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