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President Cyril Ramaphosa is Pleading with Young White South Africans to Stay in the Country

He said that his government just needs to be given a chance to address the mistakes of the past.

President Cyril Ramaphosa is doing all that he can to unite South Africans in his favor for the upcoming national election on 8th May. Ramaphosa spoke to White farmers in Stellenbosch yesterday as a part of the African National Congress's (ANC) pre-election campaign.


The widespread and deeply entrenched corruption within the ANC government has left South Africans in a stupor. Daily, revelations of just how deep state capture and the looting of state resources run, continue to be uncovered. Ramaphosa has been tasked with the difficult job of weeding out politicians implicated in corruption in order to re-instill the confidence that South Africans once had in the ANC.

Ramaphosa spoke about how there's a steady exodus of young White South Africans leaving the country to find greener pastures.

According to EWN, he said the following:

"I don't want white, young South Africans to leave the country. And if I could, I'd tie them down to a tree and say don't leave, I want you here in this country. So, I want all the skills."

Ramaphosa also added that the government would do more than just talk about their intended actions and that implementation would be their priority. "The time for talking is over, our people now want implementation. The policies that we've got are in large numbers [and] right now it is about implementation," he said.

In addition, Ramaphosa also spoke about land expropriation without compensation and the objectives of the land reform process. He addressed concerns with regards to illegal land grabs and economic stability and also ensured that the process would not violate the country's Constitution.

Watch Ramaphosa speaking on a number of issues below:

Stay in SA, Ramaphosa urges young white farmers youtu.be

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