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Dear Omarosa, Be Honest, Are You Really Nigerian?

An open letter to Omarosa on behalf of Nigerians everywhere.

Dear Omarosa, they said you're Nigerian but we don't believe you. Omarosa, I'm sure you've heard the phrase, “Naija no dey carry last," but somehow you managed to carry last on The Apprentice, not once, not twice, but three times. In the Yoruba language, that's what we call an “Olodo." Olodo literally translates to “one who owns zeroes." It is clear that you own Zero wins my sister, you also own all of the Ls as our African American brethren would say.


Dear Omarosa, many of us Africans living in the diaspora don't believe in witchcraft, juju or voodoo, we like to consider ourselves “enlightened." How foolish of us, we must now question everything we learned at Harvard, because, clearly you're acting under evil spirits, you are under demonic oppression, something is wrong and you need deliverance. I know an auntie that slipped through the immigration ban with some strong holy water, please email me so that we can help you.

Dear Omarosa, on your website, you listed that you are an Ambassador and Mentor, who dash you Ambassadorship and to what nation? And you must be mentoring people like Meek Mills given how many zeroes and L's he continues to take. From a particular angle, you guys kind of resemble one another too, but that's another day.

Dear Omarosa, what is this rubbish?

Dear Omarosa, be honest, what did you do to Michael Clarke Duncan? Be honest, this is a safe space.

Dear Omarosa, we need to see your birth certificate and passport, because we know you can't be Nigerian. Which village are you from? Who are your people? Who are your people?!!!

Dear Omarosa, we're tired of you like those 419 email scams, at least those emails gave us hope, they promised us something no matter how implausible, but you, you give us no hope. You're like, Trump, a genital rash that simply won't go away.

Dear Omarosa, stop plagiarizing your nationality, just gerrara here man.

Chinedu Hemingways is a writer based in Houston, Texas. He can be reached at chineduhem@gmail.com.

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Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

ProVerb’s Memoir Is A Huge Slap In The Face To South African Hip-Hop

In his memoir, one of South Africa's revered lyricists ProVerb and his co-author compromise his rich story with trite motivational talk.

The Book of Proverb

ProVerb has had a strange relationship with the SA hip-hop scene. Albeit being one of the most gifted lyricists the country has ever seen, he has grown to flow less and hustle more. Despite this, his name still comes up when the greatest (South) African rappers of all time are mentioned. MTV Base placed him as the 7th in their list of the greatest SA MCs of all time in 2018 for example.

The rapper-turned-media personality dedicates a paragraph of his memoir, The Book of Proverb, to explaining his complicated relationship with hip-hop. "Although I built my brand as a hip-hop artist, I never enjoyed full support or success from it," he writes. "Music is and always will remain a pass ion, but it stopped being viable when it stopped making business sense to me. If I was given more support, I might continue, but for now, I'll focus on my other hustles."

On the cover of the book which was released towards the end of 2020 by Penguin, Verb is wearing a charcoal blazer and sporting a white ball cap, so one can be forgiven for getting into it expecting both sides of his story. This memoir, however, is too vague to be a worthy read if you aren't necessarily reading to get motivated but to be simply informed and inspired.

While a few of The Book of ProVerb's chapters touch on his rap career, most of the book is about ProVerb the man, personality and businessman. Not so much one of the country's finest lyricists. This omission is a huge slap in the face for his fans and SA hip-hop fans in general.

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Filmmaker Akinola Davies Jr Explores the Sweet Spot Between Nollywood & Hollywood

Winner of the 2021 Sundance Film Festival, London-based Nigerian filmmaker Akinola Davies Jr speaks about his experimental film 'Lizard', what belonging looks like and the overlap between Hollywood and Nollywood.