News Brief

Delusional Memoirist Louise Linton Can Count Delusional Donald Trump Among Her Social Circle

“I appreciate [Trump] is polarising individuals politically, but in person he is thoughtful, personable and polite.”

It turns out white savior barbie personified, who drew ridicule for her egregious memoir In Congo's Shadow that epitomizes how NOT to write about Africa, can count delusional politician, Donald Trump, among her social circle.


Louise Linton, who penned a “nonsensical fiction" account of her gap year in Zambia, is apparently dating Steven Mnuchin, the recently appointed national finance chair for Trump's presidential campaign, Buzzfeed reports.

Did the little-known Scottish actress and self-published author charm Trump's top fundraiser with her amazing storytelling skills? Probably.

Mnuchin is also the co-founder of Dune Capital Management and OneWest Bank Group LLC in addition to producing The Field, an upcoming film from Linton's Stormchaser Films.

Linton and Mnuchin have been public with their relationship, attending and taking pictures together events at least since March. And their appearances together have been mentioned in tabloids.

In May, Linton sat next to Trump at a dinner. “He was charming and engaging," she tells Edinburgh Evening News. “I appreciate he is polarising individuals politically, but in person he is thoughtful, personable and polite." And of course she does because they sound like the same person.

Since Linton's offensive Telegraph essay went live July 1, she has deleted her Twitter account—something her new associate Trump should do ASAP.

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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