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Falz's 'This Is Nigeria' Has Been Banned by Nigeria's Broadcasting Commission

Wande Cole's "Iskaba" and Olamide's "See Mary, See Jesus" were also deemed too "vulgar" for radio.

The Nigerian Broadcasting Commision (NBC) has banned Falz's viral, politically-charged hit "This is Nigeria."

The song, which was released in May, blatantly calls out the Nigerian government and addresses many of the country's social ills. One line in particular "This is Nigeria, look how we living now, everybody be criminal" was deemed "vulgar" by the commission and thus "unfit for radio." The artist shared a photo of the letter on Instagram, making light of the NBC's move.


Wande Cole's 2016 banger 'Iskaba' and Olamide's 'See Mary, See Jesus' were also banned.

Why the ban for "Iskaba" in particular came so late, is unknown, a letter from the NBC entitled "Persistent Airing of Music with Vulgar and Indecent Lyrics," cited the lyrics ""Girl you de make me kolo, shaking the ass like kolo" as the reason for the ban.

How exactly the NBC makes such decisions is unclear.

Last years, the NBC was also accused of banning songs from Davido, Olamide and 9nice, though it denied that the song had been removed from airwaves.

Many online have called out the NBC on social media, because really, none of this makes sense.







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Photo Credit: Getty Images

Global Citizen x OkayAfrica: The Impact of Conflict on Children

An estimated 1.4 million children have been hit by schools closing in the Tigray region of Ethiopia amid conflict and crisis. Here's how that's impacting Ethiopia's children.

In times of conflict and war, school-aged children could have their futures defined by whether or not they can access education amid ongoing violence.

Ethiopia's northern region of Tigray is in the midst of a war that has impacted millions of lives and affected neighboring regions, Amhara and Afar. The war — which has forced citizens to flee, has tipped the region into famine, and has barricaded humanitarian aid from reaching the most vulnerable — has now been going on for about 11 months.

As the beginning of the school season draws nearer, safely reopening schools, making education accessible, and protecting children from the impacts of violence in the affected regions is a priority for aid agencies.

"As schools prepare to reopen in early October in most parts of the country, in Tigray and the bordering regions of Afar and Amhara, where the conflict has expanded, education remains at a standstill," Director of Education Cannot Wait, Yasmine Sherif, told Global Citizen.

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How Beauty Boy, Enioluwa Adeoluwa, Is Shattering the Expectations of Masculinity In Nigeria

Affectionately known as Lipgloss Boy, Enioluwa has become one of the most popular influencers in Nigeria — and he's done so without conforming to the notions of masculinity or imposed limitations on what a man should be able to do.