News Brief

Forbes Africa on Their New 30 Under 30 Cover and Celebrating the Continent's Rising Stars

Forbes Africa just released the cover of the anticipated June issue featuring the new class of their "30 Under 30" list. Read our Q&A with the editor here.

JOHANNESBURG—On June 1, Forbes Africa dropped their much anticipated "30 Under 30" issue featuring the latest cohort of young African entrepreneurs working on building an African business. The African edition of Forbes Magazine—a publication localized for the African business—launched in 2011, becoming the 16th local edition of Forbes magazine with distribution in South Africa, Nigeria and Kenya.


In advance of the release, Forbes Africa released the cover for the "30 Under 30" list earlier this week. We caught up with Ancillar Mangena, the Forbes Africa journalist who leads the "30 Under 30" project and asked her more about the list and why it's important to celebrate young ambitious Africans.

Take a look at the cover and read our conversation with her below.

Photo courtesy of Forbes Africa.

OkayAfrica: Why do you think Forbes Africa's 30 Under 30 list is relevant right now?

Ancillar Mangena: This list celebrates young Africans who are working hard to turn the continent’s fortune. The list is released in June, which is South Africa’s Youth Month were we remember the youth of 1976 and their role in democracy. One would argue that while the youth of '76 fought for political freedom, these under 30s are fighting for financial freedom. As we like to call them, they are the billionaires of tomorrow.

OKA: Why do you think this list is important to the continent and the diaspora?

AM: Many a time we hear of Africa’s struggle, poverty, unemployment, crime and disease, this list shows how much Africa continues to evolve. They are not waiting or asking for handouts. These 30 are not waiting for anyone to offer them a job, they are creating the jobs and building global brands. The people featured are in diverse industries from manufacturing, import and export, fashion, beauty, agriculture, tech and many more.

OKA: What about this list is different or stands out from last year's list?

AM: This year we have more women compared to last year. It brings balance and features women breaking barriers.

OKA: As a journalist at a notable media house, how does it feel to be so instrumental in shining a light on the continent's rising stars?

AM: I call the under 30s my babies. That’s how personal the process is. I have spent months studying them, looking into their lives and business. We have been communicating back and forth and I have a lot of faith in their potential. Like a mother, I will always offer support where I can so that they can one day be on the cover of Forbes Africa magazine—meaning they will be worth more than $200 million. These are the bright shining stars in Africa. You may not know their names now but you will be forced to in a few years.

Meet the new class of Forbes Africa's 30 Under 30 below. Read more on these young, African trailblazers here.

Khethi Ngwenya, 26 (South Africa)

Founder, School Media

Iyinoluwa Aboyeji, 26 (Nigeria)

Founder, Flutterwave

Lulo Rubushe, 23 (South Africa)

Founder, RNDM Network

Thato Kgatlhanye, 24 (South Africa)

Founder, ‎Rethaka

Upendo Shuma, 28 (Tanzania)

Founder, Lavie Makeup Studio

Edikan Udiong, 29 (Nigeria)

Founder, Oleander House

Sibusiso Ngwenya, 25 (South Africa)

Founder, Skinny Sbu Socks

Jokate Mwegelo, 30 (Tanzania)

Founder, Kidoti Company

Allegro Dinkwanyane, 27 (South Africa)

Founder, Orgella Media

Jishan Ahmed, 30 (Zambia)

Founder, Arete Steel

Corbyn Munnik, 26 (South Africa)

Founder, Sliide

Mike Chilewe Jnr, 27 (Malawi)

Founder, Chilewe Brands

Knight Ganje, 29 (Zimbabwe)

Founder, H&G Advertising Group

Jean Bosco Nzeyimana, 24 (Rwanda)

Founder, Habona Ltd

Rupert Weterings, 28 (South Africa)

Founder, Allied Insurance Brokers

Eugene Mbugua, 26 (Kenya)

Founder, Young Rich Television Limited and My Yearbook Kenya

Limited

Sandra Mwiihangele, 29 (Namibia)

Founder, Kiyomisandz Beauty Products

Nasir Yammama, 27 (Nigeria)

Founder, Verdant Agri-Tech

Sean Drake, 29 (Ghana)

Founder, The Wealth Project Holdings

Shaleen Manhire Nullens, 29 (Zimbabwe)

Founder, Conquered Events

Shakeela Tolasade Williams, 29 (Nigeria)

Founder, Sade Hair

Zameer Verjee, 30 (Kenya)

Founder, Studio AZ

Harun Elias, 25 (Tanzania)

Founder, Javis International Trade Co.

Muktar Onifade, 26 (Nigeria)

Founder, VIZUVLGVDS

Elijah Lubala, 27 (DR Congo/South Africa)

Founder, Naserwa Real Estate

Mwayi Kampesi, 28 (Malawi)

Founder, In-House Interiors

Godfrey Magila, 25 (Tanzania)

Founder, Magilatech

Alloysius Attah, 27 (Ghana)

Founder, Farmeline

Jennifer Glodik, 29 (South Africa)

Founder, Diva Slimming and Aesthetics Centre

Rushil Vallabh, 29 (South Africa)

Founder, Secha Capital

popular

15 South African Artists to Watch in 2019

Featuring Manu WolrdStar, Ranks, Dee Koala, Touchline, Sibu Nzuza and more.

Every year a wave of artists breaks in South Africa.

Last year saw young artists such as Mlindo The Vocalist, Muzi, Una Rams, Shekhinah, Sho Madjozi, KLY, Zoocci Coke Dope, Flame, J Molley, Rowlene and a whole lot more become household names and internet sensations. They released projects that shaped the country's musical landscape—a lot of them were on our list of 20 artists who could fuck up the game in 2018.

Alongside the aforementioned artists, there were just as many who were bubbling under, releasing singles that caught the attention of many fans. In 2019, these artists stand a great chance of expanding further and reaching more ears than they did last year.

From Manu WorldStar's lovely pop, to Ranks' version of ATM (African trap music), the refreshing Xhosa rap of Dee Koala, the street raps of Touchline, among others, we bring you a list of South African artists to keep an eye out for in 2019.

*The list is in no particular order.

Keep reading... Show less
News Brief

Netflix Has Picked Up an Animated Musical Inspired by Shona Mythology

"Tunga" is the brainchild of Zimbabwean-born screenwriter Godwin Jabangwe.

The latest African story to become a Netflix original will be an animated, family-friendly musical based on Zimbabwean culture, Deadline reports. The streaming service won a four-way bidding battle for Tunga, created by Zimbabwean-born screenwriter and newcomer to the film industry Godwin Jabangwe.

Keep reading... Show less
popular
'Play Am' single cover.

Burna Boy Teams Up With Oritse Femi & Konshens on New Track 'Play Am'

Nigeria meets Jamaica on the Young D-produced dancehall-infused jam.

Fresh off his massive collaboration with Zlatan on "Killin' Dem," Burna Boy is back with another one.

The artist teams up with fellow Nigerian artist Oritse Femi and Jamaican artist Konshens for the dancehall-infused track "Play Am."

The song opens with a memorable verse from Konshens before both Oritse Femi and Burna join in, making for a unique fusion of Yoruba, Patois and Pidgin over the track's vibrant, multilayered production by producer Young D.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.

popular.