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Gambians Call for President Adama Barrow to Resign

Gambians are protesting for the statesman to resign now that the three-year presidential term he committed to is coming to an end.

Aljazeera reports that yesterday, thousands of Gambians who are part of of the pro-democracy movement Three Years Jotna (Three Years Enough), took to the streets to call for President Adama Barrow to resign. This comes after the statesman committed to a three-year presidential tenure after he took office back in 2017.


After twenty-three years in power, former President Yahya Jammeh was defeated in the presidential election held in December of 2016. However, because Jammeh would not concede to defeat and step down as president, Barrow (along with a coalition of several other political parties and civil society groups) eventually managed to end the political deadlock.

At the time, Barrow had committed to serving a presidential term of three years and not the full five-year term. He has now reneged on his decision and is determined to serve the full five-year term. As a result, Gambians are now protesting against the decision although constitutionally, Barrow is allowed to serve the full term as a democratically-elected president.

Three Years Jotna has issued a petition to President Barrow, part of which reads as follows:

"Your excellency, the Gambian people desires for such a democratic foundation in the Gambia, which you agreed, promised and pledged to deliver for them after 3 years. We send you this petition, as members and supporters of that course, to remind you that, it is now 3 years, which marks the end of your transitional government."

Describing President Barrow's tenure, Madi Jobarteh, one of The Gambia's prominent human rights activists says, "In my view, his time has been a missed opportunity." He adds that, "What we have come to see is Barrow going against his own promises and adopting some practices of the former regime, not in terms of arbitrary arrests and enforced disappearances, but with the disfigurement of rule of law, lack of transparency and misuse of public resources."

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Six Things History Will Remember Kenneth Kaunda For

News of Kenneth David Kaunda's passing, at age 97, has reverberated across the globe. Kaunda, affectionately known as KK, was Zambia's first President from 1964 to 1991.

Following Nelson Mandela's passing in December 2013, Kenneth Kaunda became Africa's last standing hero. Now with his passing on Thursday, June 17 — after being admitted to the Maina Soko Military Hospital in Lusaka earlier in the week — this signals the end of Africa's liberation history chapter.

It is tempting to make saints out of the departed. The former Zambian struggle hero did many great things. He was, after all, one of the giants of the continent's struggle against colonialism. Ultimately however, he was a human being. And as with all humans, he lived a complicated and colourful life.

Here are six facts you might not have known about him.

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