Events

Georgetown University To Hold Inaugural African Business Conference

Georgetown University is holding its inaugural African business conference with speakers Fuse ODG, Okayafrica CEO, Abiola Oke, and more.

Fuse ODG (pictured here) and his manager, Andre Hackett, are scheduled to speak on a music panel with Okayafrica CEO, Abiola Oke, at the Georgetown Africa Business Conference. Source: Facebook


Georgetown University is holding its first-ever African business conference tomorrow in Washington, D.C.

The conference, “Africa Rising: Business In Action,” is hosted by Georgetown's McDonough School of Business in conjunction with the Walsh School of Foreign Service’s African Studies Program. “The purpose of this event is to showcase the growth and impact of the private sector across the African continent and facilitate a discussion on opportunities to continue this success,” write the event organizers.

In total, the conference will feature six panels–touching on the themes of private equity, music, banking, technology, dynamos and diaspora–and over 20 speakers.

Of particular interest to Okayafrica is a music panel with our very own CEO, Abiola Oke, joined by the artist-manager team behind the acronym and movement known as T.I.N.A. (“This Is New Africa”), British-Ghanaian ‘afrobeats’ star Fuse ODG and Andre Hackett.

The Georgetown Africa Business Conference takes place Saturday, February 6, in the McDonough School of Business' Rafik B. Hariri Building on Georgetown’s main campus. Find out more by heading to the conference's website and Facebook.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

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