News Brief

The Heroic Story of Dahomey Kingdom’s Fierce ‘Amazons’ Is Coming to TV

‘NCIS’ producer Charles F. Johnson is developing the incredible story of Dahomey Kingdom’s women warriors for a made-for-TV series.

A West African gem of a story (that doesn't involve slavery) has been unearthed and is in the process of being brought to television.


NCIS producer Charles F. Johnson partnered with French producer-director-writer Joy Fleury, and producer Karen Gordy to tell the incredible story of The Dahomey women warriors, or Amazons, as the made-for-TV series is titled, according to Deadline.

If you haven’t heard of these fierce women, they formed an all-female militia comprised of 6,000 soldiers who protected and expanded the borders of the Kingdom of Dahomey (present-day Benin) for nearly 200 years before the French colonized the West African country in 1894, according to Shadow & Act.

By the way, Dahomey was the last West African empire that withstood colonization, and gender parity including ruling authority were values intricately woven into the fabric of society.

Photo of veteran Dahomey warriors, said to be taken in the early half of the 20th century by a French newspaper via Shadow & Act

African and African-American studies academic Suzanne Preston Blier of Harvard University will serve as historian overseeing the authenticity of the production.

The live-action TV series that counts showrunner Didier Lacoste (L’ecole du Pouvoir) and writer-director Armand Bernardi, well-versed in Dahomey shamanistic practice, among its creative team hasn’t found a network home yet. But considering the historical significance of the story and the incredible bravery these women warriors have demonstrated, even the French acknowledged how formidable they were, TV networks would be foolish to bypass Amazons.

Interview

Interview: Wavy The Creator Is Ready to See You Now

The multidisciplinary Nigerian-American artist on tapping into all her creative outlets, creating interesting things, releasing a new single and life during quarantine.

A trip canceled, plans interrupted, projects stalled. It is six months now since Wavy the Creator has had to make a stop at an undisclosed location to go into quarantine and get away from the eye of the pandemic.

The professional recording artist, photographer, writer, fashion artist, designer, and evolving creative has been spending all of this time in a house occupied by other creatives. This situation is ideal. At least for an artist like Wavy who is always in a rapid motion of creating and bringing interesting things to life. The energy around the house is robust enough to tap from and infuse into any of her numerous creative outlets. Sometimes, they also inspire trips into new creative territories. Most recently, for Wavy, are self-taught lessons on a bass guitar.

Wavy's days in this house are not without a pattern, of course. But some of the rituals and personal rules she drew up for herself, like many of us did for internal direction, at the beginning of the pandemic have been rewritten, adjusted, and sometimes ditched altogether. Some days start early and end late. Some find her at her sewing machine fixing up thrift clothes to fit her taste, a skill she picked up to earn extra cash while in college, others find her hard at work in the studio, writing or recording music.

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