News

Ibeyi Release The Official Version Of Their Jay Electronica Cover 'Exhibit Diaz'

French-Cuban twins Ibeyi release the official version of their Jay Electronica cover "Exhibit Diaz" and announce extended tour dates.


Ibeyi further prove that they're true hip-hop heads with the official release of their latest track "Exhibit Diaz," a rhythmically rich cover of Jay Electronica's "Better In Tune With the Infinite." Naomi and Lisa-Kainde's honeyed vocals permeate the 3-minute track as the two share harmonies over tuneful percussion. The sisters have been performing a live rendition of the song while on tour, and decided to record a studio version since track's been so well-received by fans. The twins also recently announced an extension of their ongoing world tour — check out the fall tour dates, as well as "Exhibit Diaz" and its accompanying lyric video, below. For more on the French-Cuban duo revisit their Okay Acoustic episode, where the duo gave a stripped-down performance of their song "Ibeyi (Outro)" live in Central Park.

Ibeyi Fall Tour Dates 

30th July, Les Nuits De Fourviere, Lyon

31st July, Esperanzah!, Floreffe

2nd August, Fiest’a Sète, Sète

3rd August, Les Prairies De La Mer, Grimaud

12th August, Musikfestwochen, Winterthur

13th August, Haldern Pop Festival, Haldern

14th August, Way Out West Festival, Gothenburg

15th August, Oya Festival, Oslo

18th September, Mayan Theatre, Los Angeles

19th September, Symbiosis Gathering, Oakdale

22nd September, Mill City Nights, Minneapolis

23rd September, Thalia Hall, Chicago

24th September, The Ready Room, St Louis

26th September, Mercy Lounge, Nashville

27th September, Terminal West, Atlanta

28th September, Haw River Ballroom, Graham

30th September, 9:30 Club, Washington

2nd October, Webster Hall, New York

3rd October, Royale, Boston

4th October, Virgin Mobile Corona Theatre, Montreal

9th October, Ancienne Belgique, Brussels

10th October, La Cartonnerie, Reims

12th October, Le Trianon, Paris

13th October, La Vapeur, Dijon

14th October, Nancy Jazz Pulsations, Nancy

16th October, Ouest Park Festival, Le Havre

2nd November, Concorde 2, Brighton

3rd November, Koko, London

4th November, Trinity, Bristol

6th November, Oobleck, Birmingham

7th November, Brudenell, Leeds

8th November, Gorilla, Manchester

10th November, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Glasgow

18th November, Le Bikini, Toulouse

19th November, Paloma, Nimes

20th November, Théâtre de Villefranche, Villefranche Sur SaÔne

8th December, Melkweg Oude Zaal, Amsterdam

9th December, Mojo Club, Hamburg

11th December, Kesselhaus, Berlin

12th December, Kantine, Cologne

13th December, Technikum, Münich

Music

6 Samples From 'Éthiopiques' in Hip-Hop

A brief history of Ethio-jazz cultural exchange featuring songs by Nas & Damian Marley, K'naan, Madlib and more.

This article was originally published on OkayAfrica in March, 2017. We're republishing it here for our Crossroads series.

It's 2000 something. I'm holed up in my bedroom searching for samples to chop up on Fruity Loops. While deep into the free-market jungle of Amazon's suggested music section, I stumble across a compilation of Ethiopian music with faded pictures of nine guys jamming in white suit jackets. I press play on the 30 second sample.

My mind races with the opportunities these breakbeats offered a budding beat maker. Catchy organs, swinging horns, funky guitar riffs, soulful melodies and grainy and pained vocalists swoon over love lost and gained. Sung in my mother tongue—Amharic—this was a far cry from the corny synthesizer music of the 1990s that my parents played on Saturday mornings. I could actually sample this shit.

The next day, I burn a CD and pop it into my dad's car. His eyes light up when the first notes ooze out of the speakers. “Where did you get this?" He asks puzzlingly. “The internet," I respond smiling.

In the 1970s my dad was one of thousands of high school students in Addis Ababa protesting the monarchy. The protests eventually created instability which lead to a coup d'état. The monarchy was overthrown and a Marxist styled military junta composed of low ranking officers called the Derg came to power. The new regime subsequently banned music they deemed to be counter revolutionary. When the Derg came into power, Amha Eshete, a pioneering record producer and founder of Ahma Records, fled to the US and the master recordings of his label's tracks somehow ended up in a warehouse in Greece.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

How Nigerian Streetwear Brand, Daltimore, is Rising To Celebrity Status

We spoke with founder and creative director David Omigie about expression through clothing and that #BBNaija pic.