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Photo via Uhuru Kenyatta's Twitter page.

Kenya Will Begin To Crack Down on 'Fake News' with This New Law

This new law seeks to punish the spread of "false information," but critics and press rights organizations are skeptical.

Kenya's president Uhuru Kenyatta has passed a law that will implicate those who spread "false information" with a hefty fine and jail time, BBC Africa reports.


The Computer Misuse and Cybercrimes Law suggests a fine of $50,000 and/or up to two years in prison. The law also criminalizes abuse on social media, cyber bullying and "unauthorized interference to a computer system," where offenders will be fined $100,000 or five years in prison if it threatens national security or results in financial loss.

BBC Africa reports Kenyatta said in a statement that the new law "would provide a legal basis to prosecute cybercrimes, including child pornography, computer fraud and identity theft."

The Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) is one of many press rights organizations saying the law would stifle press freedom. They have urged Kenyatta to send back the bill to parliament to remove the clauses they say violated freedom of expression. CPJ also said that sections of the law criminalized unauthorized access and sharing of government data which would remove protection for whistleblowers, according to BBC Africa.

Kenya's Editor's Guild claims the law "may be abused by state authorities to curtail media freedom."

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How Technology Is Playing a Crucial Role in the #EndSARS Protests

Young people in Nigeria have successfully managed to use technological innovations to organize and make the #EndSARS protests run incredibly efficiently and easily. This moment will go down in history as a revolution that was birthed via technology.

It has been more than a week since young people in Nigeria took to the streets to demand that the Special Anti-Robbery Squad, infamously known as SARS, be scrapped for good. Created in 1992, this police unit was originally set up to beat back armed robbery, the use of firearms and rising cases of kidnappings that grew in the late eighties. However, the unit went rogue, becoming more notorious for its savagery than actual crime-fighting. With a rap sheet ranging from profiling, harassment and assault to, in more extreme cases, slaughtering innocent citizens, these quasi-officers have unleashed terror on the nation for more than two decades.

Their victims are predominantly young Nigerians profiled on appearance—whether they drive exotic vehicles, use the latest gadgets, have their hair dyed or locked, or have piercings. In some cases, working in tech often gets conflated with financial fraud. For people who don't meet the absurd criteria, the mood of the officer can often become the difference between life and death.

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Emile YX? Wants to 'Reconnect The String'

The father of South African hip-hop's latest book release is here to teach you about the culture.