popular

Kenyan Women are Rallying Online to Demand Better Quality Sanitary Products

Several Kenyan women believe they are sold "substandard" products compared to women in America and Europe, and are sharing their stories using the hashtag #MyAlwaysExperience.

Since yesterday, Kenyan women have taken to Twitter to express outrage at what they believe is the prejudicial selling of substandard sanitary products in their country.

Several women have taken to social media to express discontent with sanitary products sold by the international brand Always—a company under Proctor and Gamble (P&G)—with some claiming that they have suffered from chaffing, rashes and infections after using their products. Some women shared side-by-side images and videos, comparing pads sold in Kenya with those sold in the U.S. and Europe.


Women began sharing their sanitary pad horror stories yesterday on Twitter, using the hashtag #MyAlwaysExperience and it quickly began trending. Women from other African countries, like neighboring Tanzania and Ethiopia also shared similar complaints about the products. "We have similar experiences in Tanzania," wrote Twitter user LisAshuraBaraba "My friends from a young age would complain of the chaffing, allergies, infections, sales on expired products and differences with other markets. When new competitors came along they shifted quickly. We don't even have a local office."

One woman, by the name of Scheaffer Okore, shared a list of ways that the company can improve their products to better serve the needs of women in Kenya, including making "pads for humid weather" and stop "scenting pads."

Following the uproar, Always Kenya released a statement on Twitter, denying that it sells a lower quality product to Kenyan buyers. "The Always Ultra pads we have in Kenya are similar to the Always pads in other parts of the world, including Germany, UK, US, South Africa." Adding that all of their products are manufactures in Europe and the US.

However, the company's response did not do much in the way of appeasing Kenyan customers, who remain unwavering in their demand for better quality products.

Many called on the brand to reexamine their standards, while others are urging the government to support local businesses within the country instead of allowing international brands to control the market.


The online movement has received the attention of P&G and warranted an investigation into their products by the Kenyan Bureau of Standards. These actions have led several participants and observers to call #MyAlwaysExperience an example of when "hashtag activism" and social media uproar can prove effective.





popular
Photo: Mucyo H Gasana | @dailyinteractions.

Interview: Kenya's Xenia Manasseh Has Arrived

We talk to the fast-rising Kenyan artist about her debut EP, Fallin' Apart, being chosen for Mr Eazi's emPawa program and her two latest singles.

I meet Xenia Manasseh at a café as she apologetically explains that she needs to send off some songs, "you don't have WeTransfer do you?" It's about 4:20 in the afternoon and she recaps how her day has been going so far. "I haven't eaten all day. I've been trying to find a personal assistant." I ask her if things have gotten busier since her debut EP, Fallin' Apart, dropped in October, she looks up, pauses, and simply nods in relief as she finally manages to send off the tracks.

In the last year, Xenia moved to Nairobi from Atlanta. She completed and released her EP, was chosen to be part of Mr Eazi's emPawa program this year, opened for Rema's Nairobi show, recorded with Extra Soul Perception and performed on the same stage as Blinky Bill and GoldLink. As she recaps the year, you begin to realise that her stories are all rooted in meeting the right people, manifesting what she wants and gratitude.

The vulnerable-yet-soulful presence you come to know on her EP is a contrast to the bubbly and funny 23-year-old at the beginning of a promising music career. Signed as a songwriter with the Atlanta-based The UpperClassmen Music Group, she recalls taking a songwriting class at Berklee College of Music, "I couldn't write a single song, all those assignments never happened." She credits her place burning down in Boston to breaking her seven-year writing hiatus, and her subsequent move to Atlanta allowed her the change of environment she needed to continue writing.

This fast-rising Kenyan artist sat down with OkayAfrica to speak about her EP, her powers of manifestation and her two latest singles.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Keep reading...
News

Dedan Kimathi Waciuri, shown at his trial in the Nyeri forest, led an armed military struggle known as the Mau Mau uprising against the British colonial government in Kenya, 1956. (Photo by Authenticated News/Archive Photos/Getty Images)

Remains of Kenyan Liberation Leader, Dedan Kimathi, Believed to Have Been Found After 62 Years

UPDATE: The family of Dedan Kimathi is standing by earlier reports that his gravesite has been found, despite a statement from Kenya's Ministry of Interior calling the news "false and misleading."

UPDATE 10/29/19: Dedan Kimathi's family is standing by earlier reports that his gravesite has been identified, despite a recent tweet from Kenya's Interior Ministry, calling the news "false and misleading."

A foundation in the late Kenyan liberation leader's name shared a statement on Friday, claiming that his burial site had been located after 62 long years. The news was welcomed and celebrated by many Kenyans who had long been anticipating the identification of his remains.

However, over the weekend Kenya's Ministry of Interior denied the claims. According to an AFP report on the Japan Times, Kimathi's daughter Evelyn Wanjugu Kimathi stood by the original report, telling the AFP that the family released the statement without the government's knowledge or involvement. "We, the family, are the ones that went to Kamiti Maximum Prison, and were able to find the place he was buried in an unidentified grave," she said.

A video shared by the Dedan Kimani foundation appears to show a group of supporters gathering and signing around his 88-year-old widow, affectionately known as Mama Mukami Kimathi following the announcement, which comes just under a week before what would've been Kimathi's 99th birthday.

Keep reading...
popular
Still from YouTube

The Gorillaz Enlist Fatoumata Diawara for New Track 'Désolé

A stunning collaboration that we didn't even know we needed.

The Gorillaz enlist none other than Malian singer Fatoumata Diawara for their latest single "Désolé," the second single from the hit-making British band's Song Machine installation project.

"Making Désolé with Fatou was a real moment for me, you know," the band's drummer Russel Hobbs is quoted as saying in a statement via Pitchfork. Désole translates to "sorry" in French, but despite it's apologetic title, the song is a laid-back groove, elevated by vocals from lead singer Damon Albarn and Diawara, who sings in English, French and Bambara.

"She's an African Queen," Russel adds. "This lady made the song what it is, beautiful, like life. What can I say about Désolé? They say sorry is the hardest word, but that's not true.... Try saying antidisestablishmentarianism with a mouth full of gluten free cronuts on a speed boat without licking your lips."

Keep reading...
Audio
Diamond Platnumz and Tanasha in "Gere" (Youtube)

The 7 Best East African Songs of the Month

Featuring Diamond Platnumz x Tanasha, Sauti Sol, Rayvanny, Sheebah, Victoria Kimani and more.

February has been dominated by familiar voices in East African music.

Here are our picks of the best East African songs of the month featuring Diamond Platnumz, Sheebah, Rayvanny and more.

Follow our East African Grooves playlist on Spotify and Apple Music.

Keep reading...

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.

popular.