Popular

Here's the Latest on South African Artist Babes Wodumo's Assault Case

Finding it difficult to follow what's been happening with the artist and her assault case? We've got you covered.

A lot has transpired since South African gqom artist Babes Wodumo, real name Bongekile Simelane, was seen being beaten by her boyfriend and fellow musician Mampintsha, real name Mandla Maphumulo, on Instagram Live. Here's what's happened since Babes Wodumo filed an assault charge against Mampintsha and was later hospitalized for a short period.


Following her short hospitalization, what was bewildering for many Babes Wodumo fans was the surfacing of a video of the singer performing a verse from Khona Ingane Lay'ndlini, a song recently released by Mampintsha featuring DJ Tira. Loosely translated, the verse that Babes sang (also the name of the single) means "behave, there are children in the house"—the exact words Mampintsha yelled at her in their Instagram Live video that subsequently went viral.

However, Babes Wodumo's manager issued the following statement with regards to the video:

"It is not a publicity stunt. You know the song Mampintsha released was about the video (of the alleged assault). She was actually mocking the song, not trying to make it a trend. Obviously it was taken another way, but she was actually mocking the song."

More recently, the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) applied for a warrant of arrest to be issued for Babes and her sister after the pair failed to appear in court last week Friday. The pair were both charged with assault last month by a woman whom they believed had leaked a number of videos of Babes. Whilst she was not arrested, Babes was fined and given a stern warning about respecting court proceedings by the judge.

On the other hand, after laying a counter charge of assault against Babes Wodumo and starting an organization for abusers of women, Mampintsha recently expressed his desire to sue Apple Music for having removed his music from the platform following his alleged assault of Babes.


Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

Keep reading... Show less
Music

The Fugees Will Be Playing Live Concerts In Ghana & Nigeria

Ready or not.

The legendary Fugees have announced that they will be reuniting for their first shows in 15 years for a string of concerts across North America, Europe and West Africa.

The reunion tour will be celebrating the anniversary of their classic 1996 album, The Score.

Ms. Lauryn Hill, Wyclef Jean and Pras Michel will be embarking on a 12-city global tour, which will have them landing in Nigeria and Ghana for a pair of December show dates — we'll have more details on those to come.

The tour starts this week with a 'secret' pop-up show at an undisclosed location in New York City on Wednesday (9/22) in support of Global Citizen Live. The rest of the dates will kick-off in November and see The Fugees playing concerts across Chicago Los Angeles, Atlanta, Oakland, Miami, Newark, Paris, London, and Washington DC, before finishing off in Nigeria and Ghana.

Keep reading... Show less
Interview

This Compilation Shines a Light On East African Underground Music

We talk to a few of the artists featured on the Music For the Eagles compilation from Uganda's Nyege Nyege.

Nyege Nyege, a label in Kampala, Uganda is channelling the confidence brimming over a whole continent. Africa is no longer the future. For dance music, its time is right now.

Music For the Eagles is a compilation released in conjunction with Soundcloud to showcase the best new acts that East Africa has to offer outside the mainstream. A new wave of artists firmly blasting non-conformist energy for you to spasm to. Music that takes you places. Otim Alpha's high BPM wedding frenzy of incessant rasping vocals accompanied by feverous violin will have you clawing the walls to oblivion. Anti Vairas' dancehall from a battleship with super galactic intentions doesn't even break a sweat as it ruins you. FLO's beautiful sirens call, is a skittish and detuned nursery rhyme that hints at a yearning for love but reveals something far more unnerving. Ecko Bazz's tough spiralling vocal over sub-bass and devil trap energy is an anthem that can only be bewailed. And Kidane Fighter's tune is more trance-like prayer. These are only some of the highlights for you to shake it out to.

We got to chat with a few of the artists featured on the Music For the Eagles compilation as they took a break from the studio below.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

The 6 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Wavy the Creator x WurlD, Epoque, Tems, Silverstone Barz, Kofi Jamar, Olamide x Jaywillz and more