Popular
"Bensema" cover art.

Synapson Enlist Oumou Sangaré for the Blazing New Track 'Bensema'

PREMIERE: The French duo links up with the legendary Malian singer for a pulsating new song.

Legendary Malian singer Oumou Sangaré, joins French DJ duo Synapson on their latest single "Bensema."

Sangaré's powerful vocals shine on the track as she sings rhythmically over pulsating, electronic production. The Wassoulou singer brings booming energy to the dance-worthy track. The standout single marks the duo's return following the release of their debut EP Haute Couture in 2010, and their 2015 album Convergence.

The group, consisting of members Alex and Paul, wanted to work with artists from all over the world this time around, and the Grammy-winning Sangaré, was a clear favorite.


"For a while we were playing a remix of her song 'Fadjamou.' We love her really distinctive voice. It's one of the great voices of Mali which is heard all over the world," says the duo about how the collaboration came about. "We are extremely happy to have been able to work with such a great artist to signal our return after the SUPER 8 album and two years of touring. Synapson want to write a new chapter and it is an honour to write the first page with Oumou Sangaré."

Sangaré dropped the album Mogoya Remixed in 2018 which featured reinterpreted versions of songs from the previously released album.

Synapson and Sangaré make for a unique duo, listen to "Bensema" below.

Audio
(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Former President of Botswana Ian Khama Condemns Zimbabwean Government

Former Botswana President Ian Khama has condemned Zimbabwe's government and joined solidarity with #ZimbabweanLivesMatter.