Africa In Your Earbuds

AFRICA IN YOUR EARBUDS #27: LV

Download London production trio LV's 39-minute South African electronica-focused Africa In Your Earbuds mixtape.


London production trio LV have been dropping a steady stream of African-influenced, multi-layered gems on a number of UK underground labels. The producers' recent sophomore full-length Sebenza, out now on electronic elite house Hyperdub, boasts a slew of South African flavors, with features from frequent collaborator Okmalumkoolkat (of Dirty Paraffin) as well as Spoek Mathambo and Ruffest.

Africa In Your Earbuds #27 sees LV delivering a masterful Africa-electronica mixtape that gyrates around a South African core. The group describe the thought process behind their track selections:

"When we were asked to put together a mix of African or African-related tunes our minds started wandering to all the incredible music we've heard from around the continent. So many options were opened up by such a broad guideline that it was a little daunting. Should we be finding a way to mix our favourite Fela Kuti tunes with Ethiopian funk and Malian kora jams? We ended up deciding that our mix should be focused on the area of the continent that we've had the most contact with and have the deepest selection of tunes from: South Africa. The mix is not exclusively made up of South African sounds but it features them heavily along with a variety of other geography-defying hybrids."

Make sure to grab LV's excellent Sebenza LP, available now. Stream and download AIYE #27: LV below. A huge thanks to Underdog for the cover artwork.

Tracklist

Felix Laband - Black Shoes

Gregory Darsa & Julien Jabre - Les Enfants Du Bled

DJ Jagu Maftown Boy - Jungle Tunes

LV - Devil Beat

Professor feat Character - Imoto

DJ Tsoro - Kulungile

Professor feat Character - Imoto Dub

DJ Phat Cat - Woza

LV feat Ruffest - Come To Me

Das Kapital - Ratanang

Big Space - Lesotho Blue

Maxwell D - Drunken Master Part 2

Mindgames ft Navy - Reality

eX-Hoza ft. Ruffest - Woza Siyospenda

DJ Mphulo presents Angelo Agnelli - Off The Wall (Tshwara lebota)

Ruffest ft. DJ Kitano - Dear Nomalanga

DJ Killer - DJ Killer In Trouble

Diamond Bass - All That

Moroka - Blue Zone

Afefe Iku - Mirror Dance

Scratcha DVA - Fly Juice (dub mix)

D'Banj - Oliver Twist (Funkystepz Trap remix)

DJ Rashad & DJ Spinn - DJ Rashad & DJ Spinn meet Tshetsha Boys

Usher - Climax (JBS Khawulezayo Rework)

Dirty Parafin - Papap! Papap!

Previously on Africa In Your Earbuds: BEN ASSITER [JAMES BLAKE'S DRUMMER]JAKOBSNAKE, CHRISTIAN TIGER SCHOOLSAUL WILLIAMSTUNE-YARDSMATHIEU SCHREYERBLK JKSALEC LOMAMIDJ MOMAAWESOME TAPES FROM AFRICAPETITE NOIROLUGBENGA, RICH MEDINA, VOICES OF BLACK, LAMIN FOFANA, CHICO MANNDJ UNDERDOGDJ OBAHSABINEBROTHA ONACIDJ AQBTJUST A BANDSTIMULUSQOOL DJ MARVSINKANECHIEF BOIMA.

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A brief history of Ethio-jazz cultural exchange featuring songs by Nas & Damian Marley, K'naan, Madlib and more.

This article was originally published on OkayAfrica in March, 2017. We're republishing it here for our Crossroads series.

It's 2000 something. I'm holed up in my bedroom searching for samples to chop up on Fruity Loops. While deep into the free-market jungle of Amazon's suggested music section, I stumble across a compilation of Ethiopian music with faded pictures of nine guys jamming in white suit jackets. I press play on the 30 second sample.

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