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AFRICA IN YOUR EARBUDS #27: LV

Download London production trio LV's 39-minute South African electronica-focused Africa In Your Earbuds mixtape.


London production trio LV have been dropping a steady stream of African-influenced, multi-layered gems on a number of UK underground labels. The producers' recent sophomore full-length Sebenza, out now on electronic elite house Hyperdub, boasts a slew of South African flavors, with features from frequent collaborator Okmalumkoolkat (of Dirty Paraffin) as well as Spoek Mathambo and Ruffest.

Africa In Your Earbuds #27 sees LV delivering a masterful Africa-electronica mixtape that gyrates around a South African core. The group describe the thought process behind their track selections:

"When we were asked to put together a mix of African or African-related tunes our minds started wandering to all the incredible music we've heard from around the continent. So many options were opened up by such a broad guideline that it was a little daunting. Should we be finding a way to mix our favourite Fela Kuti tunes with Ethiopian funk and Malian kora jams? We ended up deciding that our mix should be focused on the area of the continent that we've had the most contact with and have the deepest selection of tunes from: South Africa. The mix is not exclusively made up of South African sounds but it features them heavily along with a variety of other geography-defying hybrids."

Make sure to grab LV's excellent Sebenza LP, available now. Stream and download AIYE #27: LV below. A huge thanks to Underdog for the cover artwork.

Tracklist

Felix Laband - Black Shoes

Gregory Darsa & Julien Jabre - Les Enfants Du Bled

DJ Jagu Maftown Boy - Jungle Tunes

LV - Devil Beat

Professor feat Character - Imoto

DJ Tsoro - Kulungile

Professor feat Character - Imoto Dub

DJ Phat Cat - Woza

LV feat Ruffest - Come To Me

Das Kapital - Ratanang

Big Space - Lesotho Blue

Maxwell D - Drunken Master Part 2

Mindgames ft Navy - Reality

eX-Hoza ft. Ruffest - Woza Siyospenda

DJ Mphulo presents Angelo Agnelli - Off The Wall (Tshwara lebota)

Ruffest ft. DJ Kitano - Dear Nomalanga

DJ Killer - DJ Killer In Trouble

Diamond Bass - All That

Moroka - Blue Zone

Afefe Iku - Mirror Dance

Scratcha DVA - Fly Juice (dub mix)

D'Banj - Oliver Twist (Funkystepz Trap remix)

DJ Rashad & DJ Spinn - DJ Rashad & DJ Spinn meet Tshetsha Boys

Usher - Climax (JBS Khawulezayo Rework)

Dirty Parafin - Papap! Papap!

Previously on Africa In Your Earbuds: BEN ASSITER [JAMES BLAKE'S DRUMMER]JAKOBSNAKE, CHRISTIAN TIGER SCHOOLSAUL WILLIAMSTUNE-YARDSMATHIEU SCHREYERBLK JKSALEC LOMAMIDJ MOMAAWESOME TAPES FROM AFRICAPETITE NOIROLUGBENGA, RICH MEDINA, VOICES OF BLACK, LAMIN FOFANA, CHICO MANNDJ UNDERDOGDJ OBAHSABINEBROTHA ONACIDJ AQBTJUST A BANDSTIMULUSQOOL DJ MARVSINKANECHIEF BOIMA.

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Photo courtesy of CNOA

These Colombian Civil Rights Activists Are Fighting to Make Sure Afro-Colombians are Counted in the Census

When 30 percent of Colombia's Black citizens disappeared from the data overnight, a group of Afro-Colombian activists demanded an explanation.

It was the end of 2019 when various Black organizations protested in front of the census bureau—The National Institute of Statistics and Informatics (DANE)—in Bogotá, Colombia to show their dissatisfaction about what they called a "statistical genocide" of the black population. The census data, published that year, showed 2.9 million people, only 6 percent of the total population of the country, was counted as "Afro-Colombian," "Raizal," and "Palenquero"—the various terms identifying black Colombians.

For many years, Afro-Colombians have been considered the second largest ethno-racial group in the country. Regionally, Colombia has long been considered the country with the second highest number of Afro-descendants after Brazil, according to a civil society report.

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Last year, a crowd of activists gathered in Bogota to protest what they saw as erasure of Black communities in the Colombian census.

Photo courtesy of CNOA

In the latest national census report from 2018/2019, there appeared to be a 30.8 percent reduction of the overall group of people that identified as Black, Afro-Colombian, Raizal, and Palenquero, as compared to the 2005. After this controversial report, an Afro-Colombian civil rights organization known as the National Conference of Afro Colombian Organizations (CNOA), officially urged DANE to explain the big undercounting of the black population.

This wasn't a small fight. Representatives who hold the special seats of Afro-Colombians in Colombia's congress asked the census bureau to attend a political control debate at the House of Representatives in November 2019 to deliver an accountability report. "The main goal of doing a political debate was to demand DANE to give us a strong reason about the mistaken data in the last census in regard to the Afro population," said Ariel Palacios, an activist and a member of CNOA.

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Afro-Colombian, Black, Raizal, and Palenquero civil-rights activists playing drums in front of the census bureau.

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Photo courtesy of CNOA

These arguments were not reasonable for the civil rights activists, partially because the state failed to properly partner with Afro-organizations like CNOA to conduct or facilitate extensive informational campaigns about the self-identification questions.

"CNOA has worked on self-recognition and visibility campaigns among the Afro community and this census ignored our work," says priest Emigdio Cuesta-Pino, the executive secretary of CNOA. Palacios also thinks that the majority of Afro-Colombians are aware of their identity "we self-identify because we know there is a public political debate and we know that there is a lack of investment on public policies."

That's why it is not enough to leave the statistical data to the official census bureau to ensure that Afro-Colombian communities are fully counted in the country. And the civil rights activists knows that. They made a big splash in the national media and achieved visibility in the international community.

Thanks to The Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA), a human rights organization, Palacios traveled to D.C to meet with Race and Equality institution and a Democratic Congressman. "We called for a meeting with representative Hank Johnson to talk about the implementation of Colombia's peace accords from an Afro-Colombian perspective but also to address the gross undercounts of its black population," says Palacios.

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The activists want to raise awareness on identity. Because according to Palacios, "In Colombia, there is missing an identity debate—we don't know what we are. They [the census bureau] ask if we are black, or if we are Afro-Colombians. But what are the others being asked? If they are white, mestizo or indigenous?" Palacios believes that for "CNOA this debate is pending, and also it is relevant to know which is the character of this nation."

Afro-Colombian Populations and the Coronavirus

Afro-Colombian, Black, Raizal, and Palenquero civil-rights activists use mock coffins and statistics to protest erasure of Afro-descendants

Colombian civil-rights activist insist that undercounting Afro-descendants can have a real impact on the health of Afro-Colombian communities, especially during the COVID-19 coronavirus crisis.

Photo courtesy of CNOA

Even though the state recently "agreed with to give us a detailed census report" and make a different projection with the micro data, says Palacios, now with the Covid-19 emergency, CNOA and the government has suspended all meetings with them, including cancelling a second congressional debate and the expert round table meeting to analyze the data.

Unfortunately, it is exactly in situations like the Covid-19 emergency where data analysis and an accurate census report would have been useful. According to the professor and PhD in Sociology Edgar Benítez from Center for Afro Diasporic Studies—CEAF, "Now it is required to provide a reliable and timely information on how the contagion pattern will spread in those predominantly Afro regions in the country and what is the institutional capacity in those places to face it," says Benítez.

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