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Mati Diop's​ ​'Atlantics' Has Been Shortlisted for an Oscar

From a selection of 91 eligible films, 'Atlantics' is among the 10 films shortlisted for an Oscar in the International Feature Film category.

Deadline reports that Senegalese filmmaker Mati Diop's Atlantics has recently been shortlisted for an Oscar in the category of "International Feature Film". The film, along with nine others from France, Czech Republic, South Korea, Spain and several other countries, was selected from a pool of 91 eligible films submitted from across the globe.


It's been an incredible year for Diop as her directorial debut continues to collect numerous nominations and awards.

Now that the film has landed on the shortlist of what was previously known as the "Foreign Language Film" category, it will progress to the nominations round where Academy members will vote on the winning film on condition that they have watched all the shortlisted films.

Atlantics has been described as a "ghost love story" which tells the haunted story of migration through the real-life experiences of Senegalese migrants who made the dangerous journey to Spain in search of better opportunities for themselves and their families.

Following a screening at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), OkayAfrica contributor Anya Wassenberg described the film saying, "Diop's directorial vision turns Dakar into a place of both surreal magic and harsh reality". Wassenberg adds that, "The film immerses the audience in the city's sounds, from the goats bleating outside a window while Ada and her friends talk, to voices in the next room, with the eternal heaving of waves against the shore as a recurring refrain."

Earlier this month, Diop took home the win for "Best First Film" at the New York Film Critics Circle Awards and went on to score a nomination at the 2020 Critics Choice Awards in the category of "Best Foreign Language Film". In May of this year, Atlantics also snagged the Grand Prix award at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival. Diop was not only the first Black woman to be included in the competition, but also the first to take home a top prize.

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Sudan Declares State of Emergency, As Military Dissolves Transitional Government

As the North African country edged closer to democracy, Sudan's military has seized power.

Sudan's military has seized power over the North African country, arresting multiple civilian leaders, including the current Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok. The power-sharing, unstable coalition, called the Sovereign Council, was created as a transitional government after the fall of dictator Omar al-Bashir in 2019, in an attempt to move towards a democratic Sudan.

The Sudanese public has been split in recent weeks as groups protested for a military-run state, while others pushed for a civilian lead, democratic nation. Last week, the Prime Minister vocalized his plans towards a full transition to civilian rule, and his plans to have that body in place by November 17, echoing the voices of thousands of Sudanese demonstrators who showed up in hoards to demand that the promise of Sudan's pro-democracy movement be honored. But on Monday the PM and multiple government ministers and officials were placed under arrest, resulting in Sudan's top general's declaring State of Emergency.

General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan said in a televised statement, "To rectify the revolution's course, we have decided to declare a state of emergency nationwide… dissolve the transitional sovereign council, and dissolve the cabinet." His statement came as soldiers fired live rounds at anti-military protestors, outside of the army headquarters in the capital.

Internet services were cut across the country around dawn and the main roads and bridges into Khartoum shut, before soldiers stormed the headquarters of Sudan's state broadcaster in the capital's twin city of Omdurman, the ministry said. After months of rising tensions in the country, army and paramilitary troops have been deployed across the capital city, Khartoum, with the airports and internet access being shut down. As a result of the coup, hundreds of protestors have taken to the streets, demanding the return of a civilian ruled and the transitional government, the BBC reports.

Demonstrators have spread to a number of Sudanese cities including Atbara, Wad Madani, and Port Sudan, and more are expected to attend the call for action. "We will not leave the streets until the civilian government is back and the transition is back," protest attendee Sawsan Bashir told AFP. While demonstrator Haitham Mohamed says, "We are ready to give our lives for the democratic transition in Sudan."


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