Music
Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

Nasty C and French Montana Hit the Club In the Video for ‘Allow’

Watch the video to Nasty C and French Montana's new collaboration.

South African rapper Nasty C just released the visuals to "Allow," his collaboration with French Montana. The song is featured on Bad Hair Extensions, the re-release of Bad Hair, the Durban-born rapper's debut album.


In the video, Nasty C and French Montana hit the club and are surrounded by scantily dressed women­ as per usual fashion on rap videos.

"Allow" is a great single that sees Nasty C making rapping look easy as usual. French Montana's parts on the song are limited, but are still significant nonetheless. "Allow" should pick up now that it has a video.

Watch it below, and keep up with Nasty C on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

Read: Nasty C's South African Hip-Hop Playlist

19-Year-Old Nasty C Understands the South African Hip-Hop Industry Better Than Anyone

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Vinegar Pap Smear Saving Women’s Lives In Malawi

This simple diagnostic test is giving hope to thousands of women in Malawi.

They say necessity is the mother of invention and in Malawi, the need for inexpensive Pap smears has resulted in a cost-effective and ingenious solution. Visual Inspection with Acetic Acid (VIA) is the only form of cervical cancer screening affordable to most underprivileged women in Malawi, according to reports.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO) "19 of the top 20 countries with the highest cervical cancer burden were in sub-Saharan Africa in 2018." Eswatini had the highest incidences followed by Malawi.

The VIA is a simple diagnostic test that can be used to screen cervical cancer, as an alternative to Pap smear cytology, in low-resource countries," according to the Role of VIA in cervical cancer screening in low-resource countries - PubMed (nih.gov) study.

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