Arts + Culture

NextGen: Black Quantum Futurism Is a Women-Led Incubator Rooted In Black Liberation

Get to know the minds behind Black Quantum Futurism—Rasheedah Phillips and Camae Ayewa—and the important work they do.

DIASPORAOver the course of July we'll be publishing short profiles, essays and interviews on the theme of "Afrofutures." Together these stories will be a deep dive into the way African and diaspora thinkers, technologists and artists view a future for Africans in the world and outside of it. 


Take a look at our introduction to Afrofuturism here.

Throughout this month, we'll also highlight and celebrate young, leading talents who already put into practice what a future with black people look like through their work in our daily profile series, 'NextGen.'

In our tenth edition, meet the minds behind the Black Quantum Futurism collective. 

Afrofuturism can be expressed far beyond music, art, fashion or film - it can be a method of activism and community building. That is exactly what Black Quantum Futurism, a women-led organization based in Philly, aspires to do, with the help of art, history and teaching.

Founded by poet Camae Ayewa of musical outfit Moor Mother, and Rasheedah Phillips of The Afrofuturist Affair, Black Quantum Futurism focuses on spreading healing, justice and memory through activism, DIY culture and art, primarily but not exclusively to people that may not have access to the internet.

"Afrofuturism can be used by disenfranchised communities to create safe space for dialogue, visioning, and testing of ideas around community sustainability, resilience, and resistance—and as a technology for the actual implementation of those visions and ideas," Ayewa says in an interview with Thump. "(It also sets) an example for other advocates and policymakers on how to creatively approach these issues using social practice and community-engaged art. That's what Black Quantum Futurism is. It's all practical—that's the main point."

At this summer's Moogfest, a music, art and tech festival in Durham, North Carolina, Black Quantum Futurism and The Afrofuturist Affair curated workshops, performances and talks around empowerment through Afrofuturism. There was "Discovering Your Secret Superpower," which helps people channel their inner superhero personas and “14 hours,” a 14-hour performance by Ayewa. Workshops and performances aside, BQF has published books, created a designated community space called Community Futures Lab in North Philly, has conducted residences and held talks around the world.

Black Quantum Futurism proves that we can write our own futures into existence, by remembering the past and envisioning a brighter present. "It's interesting how communities all over the world are understanding how important it is to move [away] from social constructs. One model that you read in some book, or some person was talking about on Facebook, may not be the model for you. We have to take the agency to define our own thing that keeps us chill, keeps our head above water."

Arts + Culture
'Sailing Back to Africa as a Dutch Woman,' 2017, from Fortia. By Keyezua, photo courtesy of Steven Kasher Gallery.

Our 9 Favorite African Visual Artists of 2018

We look back at the contemporary African visual artists who caught our eye this year.

This year, African visual artists have done their due diligence to carve their own path leading to creative autonomy, authentic storytelling and straight up greatness.

From photography and film, to even mixed-media art, the following have produced stand-out work that deserve their due accolades.

Feast your eyes on our nine favorite African visual artists of 2018 below.

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Style
Image via Beyoncé's Instagram.

Here's Every African Designer Beyoncé Wore During Her Trip to South Africa

"Thank you to the talented African designers who kept me feeling fresh. Y'all go so hard," the singer wrote on Instagram.

Beyoncé opted for bold colors and rich patterns during her trip to South Africa earlier this month for Global Citizen Festival, making a vibrant fashion statement with every outfit she was spotted in.

During her performance, the singer sported an ancient Egyptian-inspired beaded body suit, a bodice designed similarly to traditional Zulu jewelry and an emerald green ensemble made in collaboration with South African designers Enhle Mbali Maphumulo of Manual Rossa Apparel and Quiteria & George—but she rocked African-made looks off the stage as well.

In an Instagram post today, Queen Bey shared a slideshow of some of the striking outfits she rocked while in South Africa, and gave a shoutout to the designers behind them. "Thank you to the talented African designers who kept me feeling fresh. Y'all go so hard," wrote Queen Bey.

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Still from Youtube

These Nigerian Songs Broke YouTube and Google Records in 2018

Davido's "Fall" has set another YouTube record, while Wizkid's "Fever" was the most googled Nigerian song.

Nigerian music had a big year, and the numbers prove it.

After becoming the most watched Nigerian music video on YouTube earlier this month, the video for Davido's hit song "Fall" has set a new record, becoming the first Nigerian music video to reach 100 million views on YouTube.

The music video, which was uploaded in 2017, edged out Yemi Alade's memorable 2014 video for "Johnny," which currently sits at 98 million views to claim the title.

READ: Best Nigerian Songs of 2018

Last time we checked in, "Fall," directed by Daps, was sitting at just over 98 million views as well, which means it gained 2 million new views in just 2 weeks, as Konbini points out.

Davido - Fall (Official Music Video) youtu.be

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