News Brief
Photo by Mike Marsland/Mike Marsland/WireImage.

Nigerian-British Actor Susan Wokoma Joins Star-Studded Cast In 'Enola Holmes' Adaptation

Susan Wokoma has been making serious career moves this year.

2019 is the year of Susan Wokoma. The Nigerian-British actor and BAFTA Breakthrough Brit has had huge opportunities lined up for her after viewers took note of her talent on Chewing Gum.


Wokoma is set to join the stacked cast in a film adaptation based on Nancy Springer's series, The Enola Holmes Mysteries, Deadline reports. The books chronicle the ventures of Sherlock and Mycroft Holmes' younger sister, Enola—who's characterized to be just as much of a talented detective as her older siblings.

Directed by Harry Bradbeer, written by Jack Thorne and produced by Legendary, Wokoma will be working with Millie Bobby Brown, Henry Cavill, Helena Bonham Carter, Sam Claflin, Fiona Shaw and Adeel Akhtar.

Wokoma also has more exciting projects in the works: she's currently writing her feature film debt, Three Weeks—a rom-com about abortion—as well as becoming a series regular in CBS' new comedy pilot, Super Simple Love Story.

She continues to be one to watch and we're here for it.

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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