Arts + Culture
Photos by Daniel Obasi, via Coveteur.

Alexander-Julian Gibbson & Daniel Obasi Team Up for a Stunning Editorial Featuring 6 Top Nigerian Creatives

These creatives represent just a glimpse of the influence Nigeria has on the culture.

Nigerian-American stylist and content creator Alexander-Julian Gibbson returns from his recent trip to his homeland with a fresh editorial featuring six Nigerian creatives you need to know for Coveteur.

Linking up with art director and photographer Daniel Obasi, we get to know the influencers who represent the new wave of culture makers who are pushing the cultural aesthetic, Afromodernism, forward.

We caught up with Gibbson briefly to learn more about how this project came together.

Antoinette Isama for OkayAfrica: Is this the first time you've teamed up with Daniel Obasi to work on a project? How would you describe working with him?

Alexander-Julian Gibbson: Yes, it was my first time working with him. It was great, he's very knowledgable on the Lagos scene, and has an eye for what's good. He's very mature and is such a talent for his age. I'm a big talent of his work and look forward to seeing him grow and continue to be celebrated.


Nigeria is overflowing with very talented creatives who are thriving in their own lanes—why did you select these six, and was it hard to narrow your list down for this feature?

It was a mix of tons of research and serendipitous circumstances. Before going to Nigeria, I did a lot of research on creatives. Obviously, being Nigerian I knew about a lot of the dope stuff that was coming out of Lagos, but I wanted to make sure that I got my finger on the pulse of Lagos while I was out there.

I wanted a diverse group, from different paths, and wanted both men and women to be represented equally. Each person I featured was someone that I believe had a different story and perspective to tell, but still had a certain tone of using the culture as a major inspiration for their work, like Adekunle—who has such a soulful and traditional approach to his music, or Orire—who's take on her designs pays homage to traditional Nigerian fabrics.

What's the main takeaway you want viewers to have when they learn more about these creatives?

Yes, these creatives are super-talented in their own right, but do not be mistaken, they are not outliers or special cases. There are so many other insanely talented creatives, young and old, in Lagos. Others who may have not had the opportunity to be celebrated as widely, but still have undeniable talent. I hope to use this to put a spotlight on Nigerian creatives and to create more opportunities for African talent as a whole.

In a sneak peek of the editorial below, you'll see some familiar faces, as well as some new ones you need to know. Check out the full feature here.

Adekunle Gold, musician.

Photo by Daniel Obasi. Styled by Alexander-Julian Gibbson.

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Kehinde Lijadu, One Half of the Legendary Lijadu Sisters Has Passed Away

Tributes have been pouring in for Kehinde Lijadu of the celebrated Nigerian twin duo, known for their funky harmonies and themes of women's empowerment. She was 71.

Nigerians continue to mourn the loss of one of their musical legends, Kehinde Lijadu—one half of the identical twin duo Lijadu Sisters who passed away on Saturday morning after reportedly suffering a stroke, according to Music In Africa. She was 71.

Originally from Ibadan, the Lijadu Sisters, rose to fame in the 1970s. Kehinde was the second-born of the twins (in Yoruba culture, this made her the elder twin). They released their first Iya Mi Jowo in 1969 and dropped several albums throughout the 70s and 80s, including the album Danger (1976), which featured the politically-charged anthem "Cashing In," Sunshine (1978) and Horizon Unlimited (1979) which featured the standout track "Orere Elejigbo." As some of the only female acts in Nigeria's male-dominated music industry at the time, they often spoke about the challenges facing women in the scene, and the importance of social progress and women's empowerment.

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Tante Kata / Angelique, Dakar, c. 1961. Roger daSilva (C) 2018 The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation Courtesy Xaritufoto and Le Korsa

These Newly Discovered Photos From 1950s Senegal Capture the Good Times During an Era of Political Change

Unearthed photos by Roger DaSilva, which will be on display at the Also Known As Africa art and design fair in Paris this November, include rare images of presidents, jazz icons and everyday people in pre-independence Senegal.

A newly discovered collection from Senegalese photographer Roger DaSilva offers a rarefied glimpse into life in 1950s Senegal. DaSilva was born in Benin and took up photography after joining the French army in 1942. He returned to Dakar, considered his "adopted home" in 1947, where he began to capture the city's bustling social scenes. Instead of working within the confines of a studio in the tradition of fellow photographers Malick Sidibé and Samuel Fosso, DaSilva frequented "the city's night clubs and upscale weddings, he captured the vibrancy of youth culture in the post-war period and the African independence movements that were beginning to emerge."

The recently unearthed archive of over 100 of his images, which were restored by the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation will debut at AKAA (Also Known As Africa) art and design fair in Paris for the first time next month. It will mark the first time that the images are shown outside of Senegal.

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Image courtesy of Riveriswild

#BuyBlack: The 8 Black-Owned Brands To Shop For On Black Friday

It's that time of year again, here is OkayAfrica's 2019 gift guide for you to #BuyBlack this Friday.

You know we're near the end of 2019 once the holiday season comes back around. Thanksgiving is upon us and the bargain shopping and gift-giving is set to commence thereafter. While this American "holiday" being questionable in of itself, Black Friday is a prime occasion to highlight, support and spend exclusively with black-owned businesses.

Just like we mentioned last year, let's keep the 'for us, by us' energy going. Even beyond the hustle and bustle of Black Friday, tap into the businesses that continue to contribute to wealth-building, development and employment in Black communities around the world.

Here is OkayAfrica's curated shortlist of black-owned brands to take note of this Black Friday, including some standout home decor, fashion, skincare and beauty brands you should know.

Take a look below.

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'Queen & Slim' soundtrack cover.

Burna Boy Samples Fela's 'Shakara' on New Track, 'My Money, My Baby' From 'Queen & Slim' Soundtrack

The film's official soundtrack also features tracks from Lauryn Hill, Blood Orange, Megan Thee Stallion and more.

The official soundtrack for Queen & Slim has arrived, and it features a standout solo track from none other than Burna Boy.

"My Money, My Baby" is a heavily Afrobeat-tinged track that features a prominent sample of Fela Kuti's 1972 song "Shakara." The pulsating track also sees the singer, channeling Fela's signature talk-style of singing and repetition. Check it out below.

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