Events

NYC: The Most Remote Music Festival In The World


The Sahara Desert is the most unsuspecting spot for a music festival of this magnitude, but The Festival in the Desert continues to draw crowds to Timbuktu every year. Despite travel warnings, folks come out to hear music from West African, Tuareg, and Malian musicians, as well as big-name western acts such as Jimmy Buffet and Robert Plant. The Essakane Film , (trailer above) is about the battle to keep the festival going. This Thursday, Nov. 17, there will be a fundraiser and cocktail party for the film at The Player's Club in Gramercy Park in NYC from 7:30-11:00pm. You don't want to miss performances by  Essakane Film stars, the renowned Tuareg poet-guitarists Tinariwen, and American musicians JeConte and Leni Stern, as well as sneak peek footage from the film. Manny Ansar, the director of the Festival in the Desert, will also be flying in from Mali to attend. For more info click here. Purchase discounted tickets here.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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