Controversial

Omarosa Was on a Panel About Police Brutality and Needless to Say it Went Off the Rails

There was little love for Omarosa Manigault at this year's National Association of Black Journalism Conference as attendees turned their backs and a panel on police brutality descended into chaos.

We've written about Omarosa Manigault before in not so flattering terms. That was one writer's opinion though.


Today she's causing an uproar in the American media sphere due to a panel appearance at the National Association of Black Journalist's Conference in New Orleans that people in the audience are calling everything from "tense" to "31 minutes of pure insanity."

The drama started when Omarosa, a White House political aide and Trump associate, was added to a panel on police brutality at the last minute causing everyone from the moderator—the New Yorker's Jelani Cobb—and another panelist—New York Times' Nikole Hannah-Jones—to pull out citing opposition to her last minute inclusion. Understandably, the journalists might be wary of a member of an administration that's show open hostility to working journalists and has issued some less than stellar rhetoric around police brutality.

An unnamed source told Page Six, “The majority there don’t want her involved. It’s heavy drama —even the moderator is refusing. Everyone sees it as extremely offensive.”

Here's a short clip of what you missed by not going to this years National Association of Black Journalist's Conference in New Orleans plus some of the better reactions to the drama, below.

Not everyone was annoyed though:

 

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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