Audio

Meet BLFR, the 19-Year-Old Producer Behind Hits From AKA, Anatii, Riky Rick & Others

His name is BLFR, he came to Joburg a year ago, and has produced for the likes of Riky Rick, Blayze, Zoocci Coke Dope and Una Rams.

AKA and Anatii’s collaborative album Be Careful What You Wish For has been out for close to a month now. If there’s one song almost every fan has on repeat it’s “Angelz.” The track's the meaning of perfection. 

What’s least known is that “Angelz” was produced by a 19-year-old producer, originally from Rustenberg in the North West province.

His name is Big Les For Real (BLFR), he came to Joburg a year ago, and has produced for the likes of Riky Rick, Blayze, Zoocci Coke Dope and Una Rams, among others. His version of trap production consists of eerie organ keys and over-processed synths & pads alongside thick bass lines. 

Through an artist friend, Espacio Dios, BLFR found himself in Anatii’s house one day in June this year. “We went into studio and he asked if I had any beats,” says the producer. “And I had a pack of beats in my hard drive. We vibed to three beats, and one of them was ‘Angelz.’”

A week after that day, BLFR got a call from Anatii’s engineer, asking him if he was interested in the song being used for BCWYWF. “That was crazy,” he recalls.

BLFR got into production the way a lot of producers, do. “I started out as a rapper,” he says. “So I started out wanting to produce music for myself instead of downloading beats or buying beats from other people. So I just got into it, and never stopped.”

The producer’s first major credit was “Get The Bag” by Zimbabwean-born, SA-based artist Blayze. “I played Blayze beats, and he took the first one, and he told me, 'dude I’m gonna get AKA on his track,'” says the producer.

A few months ago, through his friend and artist Una Rams, BLFR’s beats reached Riky Rick, who took a few. “I found out on my birthday that he had recorded over one of the beats,” says BLFR. The song, called “Oh Lord,” was on Riky Rick’s free three-track EP Scooby Snacks, which coincidentally came out on BLFR’s 19th birthday.

Having made an appearance on rising star Zooci Coke Dope’s debut EP Morning Star, BLFR seems to do no wrong on his way to super producer status. He has more music coming with Anatii and is also contributing to Una Rams’ album due for a 2018 release. “I’m also working with other artists who I can’t mention at this stage,” he says. But looking at what he has managed to achieve in such a short space of time, one’s expectations are high.

Listen to BLFR’s beats on his SoundCloud page, and keep up with him on Twitter and Facebook..

 

Spotlight
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Global Citizen x OkayAfrica: The Impact of Conflict on Children

An estimated 1.4 million children have been hit by schools closing in the Tigray region of Ethiopia amid conflict and crisis. Here's how that's impacting Ethiopia's children.

In times of conflict and war, school-aged children could have their futures defined by whether or not they can access education amid ongoing violence.

Ethiopia's northern region of Tigray is in the midst of a war that has impacted millions of lives and affected neighboring regions, Amhara and Afar. The war — which has forced citizens to flee, has tipped the region into famine, and has barricaded humanitarian aid from reaching the most vulnerable — has now been going on for about 11 months.

As the beginning of the school season draws nearer, safely reopening schools, making education accessible, and protecting children from the impacts of violence in the affected regions is a priority for aid agencies.

"As schools prepare to reopen in early October in most parts of the country, in Tigray and the bordering regions of Afar and Amhara, where the conflict has expanded, education remains at a standstill," Director of Education Cannot Wait, Yasmine Sherif, told Global Citizen.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

How Beauty Boy, Enioluwa Adeoluwa, Is Shattering the Expectations of Masculinity In Nigeria

Affectionately known as Lipgloss Boy, Enioluwa has become one of the most popular influencers in Nigeria — and he's done so without conforming to the notions of masculinity or imposed limitations on what a man should be able to do.