News Brief

All 6 Victims Of The Quebec City Mosque Shooting Were African Immigrants

Six African immigrants were killed in a mass shooting at a Quebec City mosque on Sunday night.

On Sunday night, Alexandre Bissonnette, a spiteful, right-wing demon, entered a mosque in Quebec City and opened fire, killing 6 people and injuring 19.


It was a targeted terrorist attack against the city's Muslim population, many of which had immigrated to Canada in search of better lives.

The six men who were killed were all African immigrants. Two of the men were from Algeria, another two from Guinea, and the other two victims were from Morocco and Tunisia.

These are the victims.

The victims of the Quebec City mosque shooting. Clockwise from top left: Azzeddine Soufiane, 57; Khaled Belkacemi, 60; Ibrahima Barry, 39; Mamadou Tanou Barry, 42; Abdelkrim Hassane, 41; and Boubaker Thabti, 44.
HANDOUTS, MOUSSA SANGARE/THE CANADIAN PRESS, FACEBOOK

Abdelkrim Hassane, 41, worked as an analyst-programmer for the Quebec government. "He  had two young children who waited in vain for their father to return home," a coworker told The Globe and Mail.

Azzeddine Soufiane, 57, was originally from Morocco and emigrated to Quebec City to attend  Laval University. He was known as a backbone for newly arrived Muslims. “He was almost like the president of the community. He helped and guided all the people who arrived here – students, families,” said a member of his Moroccan community group.

Khaled Belkacemi, 60, was from Algeria. He received a master's in chemical engineer from Université de Sherbrooke and was a professor at Laval University.

Mamadou Tanou Barry, 42, and Ibrahima Barry, 39, were friends and civil-servants from Guinea that lived in the same apartment building, but were not related despite sharing the same last name. Ibrahima Barry worked for the health insurance board and had four young children, and Mamadou was an IT worker who left behind two sons.

Boubaker Thabti, 44, was a pharmacy worker from Tunisia who lived only 5 minutes away from the mosque. He had two children, ages 3 and 10.

Islamophobia has deep-seated roots and has existed even before Trump came into power, but the timing of this devastating attack—the same weekend that Trump's infamous Muslim ban was put into place—is telling. Anti-Muslim sentiments may not have started with Trump, but they are certainly propelled, and even safeguarded, by his actions. This is the dreadful outcome.

 

Music
(Youtube)

9 Must-Hear Songs From Ghana's Buzzing Drill Scene

We give you the rundown on Ghana's drill movement, Asakaa, and the most popular songs birthed by it.

Red bandanas, streetwear, security dogs, and gang signs. If you've been paying any attention to the music scene in Ghana over the past few months, then by now you would have noticed the rise of a special hip-hop movement. The movement is called Asakaa, and it's the Ghanaian take on the Chicago-born subgenre of hip-hop called drill music. It's fresh, it's hot, it's invigorating and it's nothing like anything you've seen before from this part of the world.

The pioneers of Asakaa are fondly referred to by the genre's patrons as the Kumerica boys, a set of budding young rappers based in the city of Kumasi in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. They came into the limelight towards the end of 2020, and have been dropping banger after banger since then, topping several charts and racking up millions of views collectively. The rap is charismatic, the visuals are captivating, and their swag is urban. Characterized by Twi lyrics, infectious hooks, and sinister beats, the allure and appeal of both their art and their culture is overflowing.

"Sore," one of the benchmark songs of the movement, is a monster hit that exploded into the limelight, earning Kumerican rapper Yaw Tog a feature on Billboard Italy and a recent remix that featured Stormzy. "Ekorso" by Kofi Jamar is the song that took over Ghana's December 2020, with the video currently sitting at 1.3 million views on YouTube. "Off White Flow" is the song that earned rapper Kwaku DMC and his peers a feature on Virgil Abloh's Apple Music show Televised Radio. These are just a few examples of the numerous accolades that the songs birthed from the Asakaa movement have earned. Ghana's drill scene is the new cool, but it isn't just a trend. It's an entire movement, and it's here to stay.

Want to get familiar? Here we highlight the most prominent songs of the Asakaa movement that you need to know. Here's our rundown of Ghana's drill songs that are making waves right now. Check them out below.

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