Travel

City Guide: RedRed's Guide to Budapest

Afro-electronic duo RedRed—comprised of M3NSA and ELO—show us their favorite Budapest spots and tell us where to find the best African food.

DIASPORA—In our series City Guide, we ask our favorite musicians, actors, artists and celebrities what their go-to spots are in their hometown.


In this latest installment, the afro-electronic duo RedRedcomprised of Ghanaian FOKN Bois songwriter M3NSA and Hungarian producer ELO—show us their favorite spots and tell us where to find the best African food in Budapest.

Get a taste of what the city has to offer with RedRed's guide to Budapest below and make sure to check out the group's latest single, "Sisimbo."

Favorite music venue

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RedRed: A38. One of the best clubs on earth, it's built on a Russian stone miner ship on the Danube and has a solid sound and program.

Best nightspot

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RR: Telep and Központ, the hipster magnets of the town. If you want to see a fellow musician, journalist or artist you just go there and find a dozen. In the summertime the same thing happens at Pontoon, a very nice outdoor spot at the feet of the chain bridge

Favorite place to get a drink

One of the thousand Ruin Pubs. Just to check our fresh world sensation. These are old abandoned buildings with cheap booze and drunken English stagnighters.

Watch RedRed's new music video for "Sisimbo"

Best restaurant

Depends on your taste. You can find everything from Michelin star deer steaks to agusi at our favorite African chop bar. But for some unique Budapest stuff you should go to Rosenstein.

Favorite spot to take a date

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Top of the Buda castle tunnel. The ultimate romantic spot in town, with the trademark view of our town.

Best outdoor activity

Hiking in the Buda hills. We're lucky to have a whole forest and mountain system inside our city. It's incredibly refreshing to leave the busy downtown area and get into the woods in 20 minutes.

Best place to write music

The veranda in our nice cottage

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Where do you go for inspiration?

Stay in the garden or go to Ghana.

Any other spots you'd like to highlight?

The world famous bath houses, the city market, Margaret island, and Gül Baba's Türbe.

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"Mike Tyson is a song for champions, pathfinders and trail blazers," a statement from Darkovibes' team reads. "It is for those who stand against popular opinions and make it. Runtown... touches on developmental issues in Nigeria. He also speaks on being bold in the face of institutional oppositions and signs out with a badman proclamation."

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In these afrobeats times, the primary aim of most African musicians is to make their listener's dance, or make a "vibe" or "banger" for the clubs and dance floors, rappers included. An artist setting out to dedicate an entire project to speak to the group of people who can relate with him the most, and who can learn from his stories and experiences and realize that they aren't alone in what they're facing, is impressive. It shows a level of care for his art that surpasses commercialism and all the trappings of today's music industry, and the desire to leave a lasting impact.

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The BRIT Awards 2020, which went down earlier this week, saw the likes of Stormzy take home the Best Male trophy home and Dave win Best Album.

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