News Brief

The Stories You Need to Know: Lupita Nyong'o and Rihanna's Twitter Film Gets the Green Light, South African Men Protest Sexual Violence and More

Netflix picks up the social media-generated movie about Lupita Nyong'o and Rihanna, Wizkid wins three Billboard awards, and more.

DIASPORA—The Twitter-generated film concept, based on a 2014 photo of Lupita Nyong'o and Rihanna, is coming to life, Entertainment Weekly reports. The film has been picked up in "a very aggressive bid" by Netflix, and will be directed by Ava DuVernay. Issa Rae is in talks to write the script.


Rihanna and Lupita made an informal Twitter agreement to star in the movie together last month. Read the full story via Entertainment Weekly.

SOUTH AFRICA—Hundreds of men gathered in South Africa's capital on Saturday, to protest violence against women for the #NotInMyName demonstration. The event was organized in response to rampant gender-based violence in the country.

"The time to take collective responsibility for our shameful action is now," Kholofelo Masha, one of the organizers, told the BBC. "You hear a lady screaming next door, you decide to sleep when you know there is a problem. No man should beat a woman or rape a woman while you're watching."

Check out a recap of the #NotInMyName protest, here.

DIASPORA— Wizkid won three awards at last night's Billboard Music Awards. He won for “Top R&B Song,” “Top Streaming Song (Audio),” and “Top R&B Collaboration,” for his 2016 Drake collaboration "One Dance."

SOUTH AFRICA—A drought has been declared in South Africa's Western Cape. The warning is set to last about three months.

With the onset of the drought, the region faces its most intense water shortage in about 113 years, reports BBC Africa.

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.