News Brief

Somalia Has Announced It Will Grant 'Outstanding' Somali Diasporans the Hodan Nalayeh Award

The new and annual prize has been established in honor of the journalist and founder of Interactive TV who was recently killed in an attack in Somalia.

As Somalis and Africans alike continue to mourn those lost in an attack by Al-Shabab last week, the Somali government has taken the steps to honor them—one of whom being Hodan Nalayeh.

The foreign ministry has announced the Hodan Nalayeh Award—a new, annual prize which will be given to "outstanding" individuals from the Somali diaspora who've made positive contributions to their country, according to BBC.


Nalayeh and her husband, Farid Jama Suleiman, were among the 26 people killed by Al-Shabab in Kismayo—a port city in southern Somalia. The militants stormed The Medina—a popular hotel where regional politicians and elders convened to discuss upcoming elections in the region.

Nalayeh was also nine months pregnant.

A journalist, a 13-year media and marketing vet and the founder of Integration TV—Nalayeh's life's work was dedicated to sharing African stories that are nuanced and show a different side of what her home country looks like. She was on a mission to inspire young Somalis in the diaspora to return home and contribute to rebuilding the country.

Nalayeh was also honored earlier this year in OkayAfrica's 100 Women list. Revisit her story here.

Photo Credit: Getty Images

Global Citizen x OkayAfrica: The Impact of Conflict on Children

An estimated 1.4 million children have been hit by schools closing in the Tigray region of Ethiopia amid conflict and crisis. Here's how that's impacting Ethiopia's children.

In times of conflict and war, school-aged children could have their futures defined by whether or not they can access education amid ongoing violence.

Ethiopia's northern region of Tigray is in the midst of a war that has impacted millions of lives and affected neighboring regions, Amhara and Afar. The war — which has forced citizens to flee, has tipped the region into famine, and has barricaded humanitarian aid from reaching the most vulnerable — has now been going on for about 11 months.

As the beginning of the school season draws nearer, safely reopening schools, making education accessible, and protecting children from the impacts of violence in the affected regions is a priority for aid agencies.

"As schools prepare to reopen in early October in most parts of the country, in Tigray and the bordering regions of Afar and Amhara, where the conflict has expanded, education remains at a standstill," Director of Education Cannot Wait, Yasmine Sherif, told Global Citizen.

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Interview

How Beauty Boy, Enioluwa Adeoluwa, Is Shattering the Expectations of Masculinity In Nigeria

Affectionately known as Lipgloss Boy, Enioluwa has become one of the most popular influencers in Nigeria — and he's done so without conforming to the notions of masculinity or imposed limitations on what a man should be able to do.

In November 2020, Enioluwa Adeoluwa uploaded a video of himself talking direct-to-camera about indecisive admirers who kept wasting his time on pleasantries instead of properly shooting their shots. The twenty-five-second video featured Enioluwa, with a durag tied around his head, switching between English and Yoruba, dramatically punctuating his woes all while applying lip gloss.

The video instantly went viral.

When Enioluwa uploaded the video, he had no idea he was about to become an internet sensation. Enioluwa, a then 21-year old Marketing Masters student living in Lagos and working as a content creator for a fintech company, was surprised at how many people related to the video. Adeoluwa began posting short self-filmed videos of himself often while applying lip gloss. Sometimes reacting to someone else's video, other times giving hilariously lousy advice to his followers, or just poking fun at dating tropes and talking about life, relationships, and skincare. These videos quickly gained traction and were going viral almost daily. Enioluwa became an internet friend to many, offering advice and skincare tips with a big smile.

Today, Adeoluwa, who turned 22 this past July, has almost 300 thousand followers on Instagram, more than 320 thousand followers on TikTok, a late-night show, and has worked with multiple leading global beauty and lifestyle companies. Even with all this success, Enioluwa hasn't lost what made him unique: a relatable and casual air that is rare among influencers. Enioluwa still prefers to bring out his phone and lip gloss to make a quick video where he complains or rants about things or people. It is his commitment to remain funny, relatable, and even chaotic that endears him to his followers. To them, despite his success, Enioluwa has remained the crop top wearing boy-next-door who puts on lip gloss while reminding them they are the prize and they should cut off anyone who doesn't treat them as such.

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News Brief
Photo: Getty

Here's What You Need To Know About The Political Unrest In Sudan

Thousands have been protesting the Sudanese government over the weekend, supporting the military's plans for a coup.

Sudan's transitional government is in turmoil as thousands of citizens conducted a sit-in protest against them, over the weekend. A group of Sudanese citizens have called on the military to disestablish the nation's current government, as the country struggles with the greatest crisis they've seen since the end of former dictator Omar al-Bashir's controversial ruling, two years ago. The weekend's pro-military protests come as anti-military protestors took to the streets earlier this month to fight for civilian-ruled laws.

Military-aligned demonstrators assembled outside of the famously off-limits entrance of the Presidential Palace located in the Sudanese capital, Khartoum on Monday. Gatherers set up tents, blocking off access to two main intersections, cutting off access to the capital for those inside. Police attempted to wave off crowds with teargas, with Khartoum state officials saying they had, "repelled an attempted assault on the seat of government," in a statement issued Monday.

The assembly was called for by a coalition of rebel groups and political parties that support Sudan's military, accusing the civilian political parties of mismanagement and monopolizing power under their ruling. Demonstrations began on Saturday, but Sunday's gathering saw a lower attendance. According to Reuters, by Monday afternoon, thousands, between 2,000 - 3,000, had returned to voice their concerns. 52-year-old tribal elder Tahar Fadl al-Mawla spoke at the helm of the sit-in outside of the Presidential palace saying, "The civilian government has failed. We want a government of soldiers to protect the transition." Alongside a 65-year-old Ahman Jumaa who claimed to have traveled more than 900 kilometers (570 miles) from Southern region Nyala to show his support.

Protesters are demanding the appointment of a new cabinet that is "more representative of the people who participated in the December 2019 revolution that eventually led to the ousting of former president Omar al-Bashir", Al Jazeera reported from Sudan. Protesters headed towards the Presidential Palace, where an emergency cabinet meeting was being held when they were met by police forces.

Pro-civilian political parties have plans for their own demonstration on Thursday, the anniversary of the 1964 revolution that overthrew Sudan's first military regime under Ibrahim Abboud and brought in a period of democracy that the country still struggles to uphold.


Sudanese Twitter users shared their thoughts online, with many drawing similarities between the current unrest and other political crises the nation has faced.


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