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The Songs You Need to Hear This Week

These are the best songs that came across our desks this week, featuring Mr Eazi, Ibeyi, DJ Spinall and more.

At the end of every week, we highlight the creme of the crop in music and round up the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks throughout the last few days.


Check out all of the "Songs You Need to Hear This Week" in our extended Apple Music curator playlist and read about some of the selections ahead.

Mr Eazi "Leg Over"

Mr Eazi connects Ghana and Nigeria like no one else on his new mixtape Life Is Eazi, Vol. 1 – Accra To Lagos. The excitement brought on by his rise and this new release isn’t too different from that which greeted his Starboy label boss, Wizkid.

Kae Sun "Flip the Rules"

Canadian-based Ghanaian singer Kae Sun has been making some of the strongest pop tunes on our radar for a while now. His latest, "Flip the Rules," is full of soul.

DJ Spinall x Davido x Wande Coal

DJ Spinall recruits Davido and Wande Coal for this all-star dance floor banger "Olowo."

Stream our ‘Songs You Need to Hear’ playlist on Apple Music.

 

Ibeyi "Lost In My Mind"

Afro-Cuban twins Ibeyi have been quiet since their work on Beyoncé's Lemonade. They return with the dark and ruminating "Lost In My Mind."

Aina More's "Healer"

London fly girl Aina More, who's penned some serious afro-house jams lately, shares her new single "Healer." It's a“true healing song for myself and the producer," the singer mentions. "It was the first recording I made after losing my Dad and it provides me with a true uplifting feeling and I hope it does the same and more for others.”

MC Galaxy "Your Love"

Nigerian comedian and musician MC Galaxy came through with the romantic video for his new single "Your Love." If you recall, last year Swizz Beatz remixed his previous hit "Sekem."

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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