News Brief

This South African Model Shut Down a Body Shamer With One Epic Tweet

In what some are calling "the clap back of the year," Lesego Legobane, dragged a body shamer, and we're all fans.

South African model, photographer and blogger, Lesego Legobane, who we featured on our list of African women who will make you rethink #bodygoals, knew just what to say when popular South African Twitter user, Leyton Mokgerepi, implied that she was undesirable based on her size.

Mokgerepi posted a side by side image of another woman, next to Legobane's picture with the caption, "Girls who I like vs. Girls who like me."

Upon seeing the tweet, the model, also know as Thickleeyonce, set the offender straight with four simple words: “I don't like you."

The stinging response garnered widespread praise on social media and is currently pushing a million likes. It's been faved by the likes of Ava DuVernay and Nicki Minaj.

Legobane told Buzfeed that she's received messages from women who were inspired by her body positivity, and that she's glad that her tweed has encouraged self-love. "It means a lot to me that I can change someone's perception about their physical appearance by loving my own," she said.

The other woman pictured in the side-by-side wasn't having it either. "It was not a well thought out compliment, if that is what he was trying achieve," Joëlle Kayembe told Buzfeed. "And to use one woman's picture (mine in this case) to body-shame another is just rude and unnecessary!"

Basically, no one is here for body-shaming or misogyny either, for that matter. We're very glad that Legobane put homeboy in his place—we're willing to bet that he won't try this foolishness again.

"I hate it when men think that fat girls are desperate and that we like every other guy 'cause we don't have options," she said. "It's utter nonsense. I can be fat and still be out of your league."

Preach, sis!

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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