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Twitter Salutes Congolese Woman Who Climbed the Statue Of Liberty to Protest Trump's Immigration Policies

Therese Patricia Okoumou told authorities that she wouldn't come down "until all the children are released."

There are many ways to protest. For some it's taking to the streets and marching, for others it's carrying out random acts of kindness. Yesterday, for immigrant activist Therese Patricia Okoumou, protesting meant scaling the Statue of Liberty in a courageous demonstration against Trump's dreadful anti-immigration policies on the very day meant to mark America's independence.

The 44-year-old Congolese immigrant and Staten Island resident, climbed the tower on Tuesday to protest Trump's "zero tolerance" policy that caused thousands of immigrant children to be detained and separated from their parents. She told police that she would not "come down until all the children are released," reports CNN.


It took four hours before the police could get Okoumou down, after which she was taken into custody.

Okoumou is an active member of New York-based activist group Rise and Resist, whose members had previously held an "Abolish I.C.E" banner at the statue. Members of the organization said they had no knowledge of Okoumou's plans, but released a statement of support, stating that they are seeking out the best legal representation for Okoumou.

Okoumou has been involved in several anti-Trump demonstrations in the past, even being arrested last year at a protest at the Department of Labor, reports Huffington Post.

She's being applauded for her dedication and bravery on social media. Much like when Bree Newsome climbed a 30-foot flagpole in South Carolina to remove the Confederate flag two years ago, Okoumou is yet another example of black women stepping up in the name of social justice, when others won't.
















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(Photo by STR/AFP via Getty Images)

Pregnant Tanzanian Girls Now Have Hope Of An Education

In the past, Tanzania's pregnant girls of school-going age were banned from accessing an education. However, things are about to change!

If a young girl of school-going age happened to fall pregnant in Tanzania, it usually spelled the end of her schooling career — and the death of any prospects she may have had for a bright future. In Tanzania currently, an estimated 5 500 girls are forced to leave school each year due to pregnancy, according to the World Bank.

The Tanzanian government has announced a new programme aimed at addressing the plight of young girls who have been impacted by this discriminatory ban. Tanzania's Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Education, Science and Technology Leonard Akwilapo said young girls will now be offered an opportunity to further their schooling at alternative colleges.

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