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Lady Donli's Debut Album 'Enjoy Your Life' Is Here

An honest offering from the Nigerian artist your ears need to hear.

Enjoy Your Life, Lady Donli's debut album, was well worth the wait.

Nigeria's very own released an honest offering Friday that's a declaration of her growth and who she is as an artist.

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Tay Iwar: Nigeria's Most Reclusive Musician Opens Up

In his most open interview ever, the Nigerian artist demystifies himself, opening up about his reclusive personality and why emotions are the biggest drivers of his art.

Tay Iwar won't touch anything that lacks a strong emotional pull. It's a driver for all the music that he makes.

He has been a satiated lover ("Satisfied"), a vulnerable sage ("Weather Song"), an existentialist thinker ("Utero"), and a straight-up loser ("Sugardaddy") across his debut album's songs. "I fell in love with you and I almost died," he sings on "Monica," the lead single off that album, Gemini.

When I ask Tay about Gemini on a hot, sweaty afternoon at his Bantu Studio in Abuja, Nigeria, he seems proud of it. Staring into the distance, he says he considers the RnB fusion record his first album which doesn't have him selling emotions to people. He is simply expressing himself now, rather than the more "packaged" offerings on his previous projects Passport (2014) and Renascentia (2016). It's huge artistic growth for a 21-year-old, one in which he is basking.

Tay, born Austin Iornongu Iwar, hated it when his father forced him to take classic piano lessons at an early age. But by the time he was 13, and midway through high school, that sentiment had become the opposite; he had fallen deeply in love with the art, making music on his computer, and teaming up with his brothers—Sute and Terna Iwar—to co-found the Bantu Collective. His first love was the guitar, but something about making music on the colourful "video game" early version of the FL Studio software got him hooked. Mastering instruments, and becoming a sound engineer gave him a high-level of understanding of music creation. At 16, he released his debut project, Passport, which became an instant niche favorite, offering him a modicum of fame and demand that surprised the artist.

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Santi's Highly-Anticipated Album 'Mandy & The Jungle' Is Here

The alté maestro has released his vibe-filled project featuring DRAM, Tay Iwar, GoldLink, Amaarae and more.

As we all know by now, Nigeria's own Santi has been one to watch.

The alté maestro dropped his highly-anticipated album, Mandy & The Jungle Friday—a vibe-filled project featuring the likes of DRAM, GoldLink (who recently collaborated with Maleek Berry), Tay Iwar, Amaarae, Nonso Amadi and more.

"Over the past two years, I learnt more about expressing myself and translating that feeling into sound and visuals," Santi explains to Clash Magazine.

"Music has always been about the feeling for me, what it does to you, what it makes you remember and most importantly, where it takes you to. I decided to create a universe, combining everything that has ever influenced or inspired me, the story of Mandy, a girl who has no idea the power that lies inside her."

Mandy & The Jungle warrants repeated listening, as Santi tells multifaceted tales of friendship, complex love to subsequent heartbreak.

Zone out and listen to it below.

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Tay Iwar. Photo: Terna Iwar.

Tay Iwar Is Nigeria's Hidden Gem

In a rare interview, the reclusive Nigerian singer and producer talks in-depth about writing and producing his new EP 1997, his forthcoming album Gemini and Nigeria's 'Alté' movement.

Tay Iwar wants some space. The word is the title of one of three songs on his new EP and also one that comes up during our interview, conducted via voice notes and texts on Whatsapp from his base in Abuja—a long way from Lagos which remains Nigeria's music hub.

The choice of the nation's quieter capital over the bustle of its music metropolis is a deliberate one for Iwar and one which fevers his reputation as a recluse and cult figure in Nigerian music circles. This especially happens among the subculture referred to as "alté"—an abbreviation of the word alternative which is used to denote the independent movement that is free from the flash and perceived vacuity of afropop. Precise definitions of the word vary but common denominators include introspection and melancholia, as well as trap and R&B.;

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