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Watch Chika's Cerebral Performances on Jimmy Kimmel Live

The Nigerian-American MC drops serious bars in "No Squares" and "Richey v. Alabama."

Chika Oranika, also just known as Chika, recently made her late night TV debut on Jimmy Kimmel Live, guest hosted by Lena Waithe.

Waithe is a huge fan of the Nigerian-American wordsmith (as we all are, let's be real), especially since her freestyle about the rise and fall of Kanye West went viral last year. The rapper continues to be inspired about current events and eloquently gives much needed thoughts and commentary through straight bars.

With her performances of "No Squares" and "Richey v. Alabama" on the show, it's fair to say that she's the internet's unofficial poet laureate.

"We all know what's going on in Alabama right now, and I'm from Alabama. I felt like with this opportunity and the way that it lined up, it would make so much sense for me to come on here and speak for people who would otherwise feel voiceless," she shares with Waithe on what inspired "Richey v. Alabama."

She continues:

"Richey is the last name of one of my best friends who has such a powerful story when it comes to what's going on in Alabama. I felt like this would be a proper tribute to her, and also a proper tribute to all women in Alabama—all people in Alabama with wombs who are able to carry children—and I felt like this is my time to speak for us."

Watch her poignant performances below.


Chika - No Squares youtu.be


Chika - Richey v. Alabama youtu.be

Audio
(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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Former President of Botswana Ian Khama Condemns Zimbabwean Government

Former Botswana President Ian Khama has condemned Zimbabwe's government and joined solidarity with #ZimbabweanLivesMatter.