Film
Image via Netflix.

Watch the Lighthearted New Trailer for Idris Elba's Netflix Series 'Turn Up Charlie'

The actor is also preparing for his first-ever appearance on SNL.

Idris Elba is a man of many talents, and they all come together on his upcoming Netflix series Turn Up Charlie.

The comedy will premiere next month on the global streaming service. Ahead of its release, Netflix has dropped the trailer for the show, in which Elba plays a struggling DJ-turned nanny—drawing on elements of his own life pre-megastardom. This is Elba's second comedy series following the family show In the Long Run, which premiered in 2018.


Here's a full synopsis of the show:

Turn Up Charlie centers on the titular Charlie (Idris Elba), a struggling DJ and eternal bachelor, who is given a final chance at success when he reluctantly becomes a 'manny' to his famous best friend's problem-child daughter, Gabby (Frankie Hervey). Piper Perabo and JJ Feild co-star.

The newly released trailer sees the actor, who's convinced his parents that he is a "music mogul," taking on gigs at Nigerian weddings and becoming a nanny to a sly young girl who has made a habit out of terrorizing her nannie. Check it out below.

Turn Up Charlie | Official Trailer [HD] | Netflix www.youtube.com

Elba will make his Saturday Night Live debut on Saturday, March 9 in support of the shows premiere. All eight episodes of the show will be available on Netflix on March 15.


Music

6 Samples From 'Éthiopiques' in Hip-Hop

A brief history of Ethio-jazz cultural exchange featuring songs by Nas & Damian Marley, K'naan, Madlib and more.

This article was originally published on OkayAfrica in March, 2017. We're republishing it here for our Crossroads series.

It's 2000 something. I'm holed up in my bedroom searching for samples to chop up on Fruity Loops. While deep into the free-market jungle of Amazon's suggested music section, I stumble across a compilation of Ethiopian music with faded pictures of nine guys jamming in white suit jackets. I press play on the 30 second sample.

My mind races with the opportunities these breakbeats offered a budding beat maker. Catchy organs, swinging horns, funky guitar riffs, soulful melodies and grainy and pained vocalists swoon over love lost and gained. Sung in my mother tongue—Amharic—this was a far cry from the corny synthesizer music of the 1990s that my parents played on Saturday mornings. I could actually sample this shit.

The next day, I burn a CD and pop it into my dad's car. His eyes light up when the first notes ooze out of the speakers. “Where did you get this?" He asks puzzlingly. “The internet," I respond smiling.

In the 1970s my dad was one of thousands of high school students in Addis Ababa protesting the monarchy. The protests eventually created instability which lead to a coup d'état. The monarchy was overthrown and a Marxist styled military junta composed of low ranking officers called the Derg came to power. The new regime subsequently banned music they deemed to be counter revolutionary. When the Derg came into power, Amha Eshete, a pioneering record producer and founder of Ahma Records, fled to the US and the master recordings of his label's tracks somehow ended up in a warehouse in Greece.

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