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Mercury Prize Winners Young Fathers To Release New Single, 'Soon Come Soon'

Mercury Prize winners Young Fathers will follow up their debut album, 'DEAD,' with "Soon Come Soon," a new single out 12/1 on Big Dada.


Last month Scottish / Nigerian / Liberian Edinburgh-based trio Young Fathers beat out FKA Twigs, Damon Albarn, Bombay Bicycle Club and other UK heavyweights to take home the 2014 Barclaycard Mercury Prize for the best British or Irish record of the year. This weekend YF's Alloysious, Kayus and G returned with a surprise follow-up to their proper LP debut, DEAD. "Soon Come Soon" is a one-off single the group recorded in southern California. Here's the story according to Big Dada:

"In a corporate, brown brick Los Angeles building, low and flat, under the dirty blue of the western precipice, amongst the death trade military complex and the Hollywood propaganda machine, a song is born. It's a boy! An apocalyptic boy, looking just like his mother.

Young Fathers had got together for a wild night in a studio ran by a man called Daddy Kev. Under the influence of surf, skunk and earthquakes they got choral, and so the end of the world became a pop song."

"Soon Come Soon" is out December 1 on Big Dada. Stream it below. For more on YF, watch the guys talk about their African lineage, the special touch on their music videos, and their original sound via Okayafrica TV.

>>>Listen to Young Father's "Soon Come Soon"

Young Fathers Tour Dates:

12/7/2014: DRILL Festival @ Brighton, UK

12/10/2014: XOYO @ London, UK (sold out

04/10/2015: Brooklyn, NY @ Music Hall of Williamsburg

04/24/2015: Los Angeles, CA @ The Echo

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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