Interview
Image courtesy of the artist.

Oxlade Took a Leap of Faith and Landed On a Global Phenomenon

We talk to Oxlade about the phenomenon that is "Ku Lo Sa," his upcoming album, and the domino effect that has led him to this point.

Oxlade’s sultry voice was first introduced on his big break, Blaqbonez’s "Mamiwota," and from that moment it was apparent that Nigerian music had another star on its hands. It was a performance that helped change the tide towards mid and low-tempo songs in mainstream Nigerian music. It was only a matter of time before Oxlade proved to the world that he was a force to be reckoned with, and a special talent among the new guard of Afrobeats stars.

Olaitan Abdulrahman, popularly known by the name his grandfather gave him ‘Oxlade,’ has a success story that blossomed at the confluence of opportunity and preparation. The new superstar was never sure of his path when he was just making ends meet, all he had was a voice, one fine-tuned since adolescent choir years, and a heart that believed he was destined for more. Four years later, with a couple of hits in his catalog, and a record deal with Epic Records, the spotlight is now on Oxlade.

In a year that has had major young Nigerian stars like Rema and Fireboy DML push African music to bigger frontiers globally, Oxlade lays his claim as well with the viral hit "Ku Lo Sa." The eargasmic Afro-tune was Oxlade’s latest offering in collaboration with German creative house COLORS Studios. For Oxlade this was all unplanned but yet he’s grateful and excited to share what he has in store, the music he believes is the best version of Oxlade his growing fans have heard.

“I make ethereal music. Ethereal is something that is so delicate, and it's so special. That almost sounds godlike.”

We talk to Oxlade about the phenomenon that is "Ku Lo Sa," his incoming album, and the domino effect that has led him to this point.

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Wizkid's New Song Sparks Strong Debates About Amapiano Online

The social media reactions reopened an ongoing conversation about ownership of Amapiano, and Nigerian music’s adaptation of it, with even Davido and Maphorisa weighing in.

Often, Western media is quick to forget Africa is a large continent filled with different countries that preserve their individual qualities and cultures while still contributing to the African continent as a whole.

Wizkid’s latest release "Bad To Me," which caused an uproar yesterday, exhibits issues that can unfold as a result of these misconceptions. The song’s P2J production leans heavily on drums and percussions popularized by South African Amapiano, a sound that’s been taking the world by storm.

Yesterday’s reactions reopened an ongoing conversation about ownership of Amapiano, and Nigerian music’s adaptation of it. South African fans rightfully feel credit should be given to their artists for the genre they’ve popularized. The question that lingers is whether there is, or should be a line between creators and adopters. Even the likes of Davido, DJ Maphorisa, KDDO and May D weighed in.

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