News Brief

25K Drops Visuals for ‘Netflix’ Featuring Doobie Man

Watch 25K's new music video.

25K released the single "Netflix" around the same time this year. The single recently got treated to visuals.


Just like most of 25K's music, "Netflix" makes reference to a lot of activities that occur in the streets over trap production. Which you would expect from a rapper whose epithet is "The Plug" and another called Doobie Man.

The song is produced by Mega Beats who 25K has worked with extensively on many songs, including the rapper's viral hit "Culture Vulture," which recently saw Emtee and AKA jump on its remix.

In the video, directed by Untamed Pictures' Ayanda Mayo Sedibe, the rappers and their goons can be seen making illegal deals, exchanging cash for a mysterious backpack.

As mentioned above, the song is a year-old. It might be too old a song for other rappers to film visuals for. But, 25K's first hit "Culture Vulture" was only treated to a video a year and a half since its release, and it went viral another year and a half later (more about that here).

So, you may choose to sleep on "Netflix" now, but you just might find yourself jamming to it in the future.

25K has been on everyone's radar since the success of "Culture Vulture" and his deal with Universal Music Group.

Watch the music video for "Netflix" and stream the song underneath.

25K & Doobie Man - Netflix (Official Music Video) www.youtube.com


Audio
(Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images)

The 10 Best HHP Songs Ranked

On the second anniversary of HHP's passing, we rank 10 of the South African hip-hop legend's best songs.

Jabulani Tsambo, popularly known by his alias HHP, was a pivotal part of South African hip-hop. Renowned for trailblazing the motswako sub-genre in the early 2000s, the rapper sadly passed away on October 24th, 2018 after a long and much publicised bout with depression.

During his active years, which span two decades (from 1997 to 2018), he was instrumental in breaking barriers and bridging the gap between kwaito and hip-hop in SA, from the late 90s to early 2000s.

He became a household name in the 2000s as he spearheaded the motswako movement, propelling it to the mainstream and solidifying his legendary status in the process.

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