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AFRICA IN YOUR EARBUDS #9: DJ OBAH - 'HEY MAMA'


New York's own DJ Obah takes a alternately angled shot at our Africa In Your Earbuds series. Instead of crafting a purely African-bred mix, Obah opts to "feature artists who aren't born or based on the continent, but yet have been inspired by the history, sounds, and culture of African music." He then bridges the gap by including a couple of classics from the diaspora.

The result is Africa In Your Earbuds #9: Hey Mama — a stew of hip-hop cuts from Kweli, Mos Def, Common and Jay-Z peppered with tunes from Tony Allen, Manu Dibango and Osibisa. The name pays homage to Africa as the motherland. Obah explains, "it's like saying 'Hey Mama'... look what I've been up to."

AFRICA IN YOURS EARBUDS #9: DJ OBAH - 'HEY MAMA' by okayafrica

TRACKLIST

1. Reflection Eternal - Africa Dream

2. Mos Def - Fear Not of Man

3. Hypnotic Brass Brand - Water

4. Jay Z - Pray (Mike Love's Nigerian Gangsta Remix)

5. Ty & Bries - Unsung Heroes

6. Common - Heat

7. Tony Allen - Asiko

8. Manu Dibango - New Bell (MAW Remix)

9. Rocky Dawuni - Masterplan (Dj OBaH Remix)

10. The Pimps of Joytime - Gosalo

11. Dj Spinna - Deep rooted

12. Oscar Sulley - Olufeme (Natural Self Remix)

13. The Sahara All-Stars - Enjoy Yourself

14. Osibisa - Music for Gong Gong

15. Mulatu Astataque - Yegelle Tezeta

16. Damian Marley & Nas - As We Enter

Previously on Africa In Your Earbuds: SABINE, BROTHA ONACIDJ AQBTJUST A BANDSTIMULUSQOOL DJ MARVSINKANECHIEF BOIMA.

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